September 11, 2009<p><b>Hunters in <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLTRA0000115" title="Everglades" href="/topic/environmental-issues/natural-resources/everglades-PLTRA0000115.topic">Everglades</a> warned: Don't eat the pythons</b></p><p>South Florida - Even as state officials are expanding their python-hunting program in South Florida, scientists have discovered that the exotic Burmese pythons slithering around in the Everglades have a surprising problem.</p><p>Tissue samples taken from two dozen of the enormous constrictors captured in <a class="taxInlineTagLink" id="PLCUL000145" title="Everglades National Park" href="/topic/travel/tourism-leisure/everglades-national-park-PLCUL000145.topic">Everglades National Park</a> turned out to have what National Park Service officials call "extraordinarily high levels of mercury."</p><p><a href="http://www.tampabay.com/news/environment/wildlife/hunters-in-everglades-warned-dont-eat-the-pythons/1034196" target="blank" rel="nofollow">Click here for the whole story</a></p>

September 11, 2009

Hunters in Everglades warned: Don't eat the pythons

South Florida - Even as state officials are expanding their python-hunting program in South Florida, scientists have discovered that the exotic Burmese pythons slithering around in the Everglades have a surprising problem.

Tissue samples taken from two dozen of the enormous constrictors captured in Everglades National Park turned out to have what National Park Service officials call "extraordinarily high levels of mercury."

Click here for the whole story

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