From "Catcher In The Rye"

"Finally we found the place where the mummies were, and we went in. "You know how the Egyptians buried their dead?" I asked the one kid. 'Naa.' 'Well, you should. It's very interesting. They wrapped their faces up in these cloths that were treated with some secret chemical. That way they could be buried in their tombs for thousands of years and their faces wouldn't rot or anything. Nobody knows how to do it except the Egyptians. Even modern science'."<br>
<br><b>In photo:</b>Using a circa 1970 Polaroid camera, Jessica Palmer, a painter and animator from Toronto, makes photographs of the Temple of Dendur in the Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibit of ancient Egyptian Art.

( Mark Mirko / mmirko@courant.com / May 5, 2013 )

"Finally we found the place where the mummies were, and we went in. "You know how the Egyptians buried their dead?" I asked the one kid. 'Naa.' 'Well, you should. It's very interesting. They wrapped their faces up in these cloths that were treated with some secret chemical. That way they could be buried in their tombs for thousands of years and their faces wouldn't rot or anything. Nobody knows how to do it except the Egyptians. Even modern science'."

In photo:Using a circa 1970 Polaroid camera, Jessica Palmer, a painter and animator from Toronto, makes photographs of the Temple of Dendur in the Metropolitan Museum of Art's exhibit of ancient Egyptian Art.

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