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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A collection of news and information related to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration published by this site and its partners.

Top National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Articles

Displaying items 67-77
  • Home improvement for stranded sea lions

    Home improvement for stranded sea lions
    Whizzing drills and pounding hammers have mostly replaced yelping sea lions these days at the Pacific Marine Mammal Center. Staff and volunteers who help rehabilitate sick and injured pinnipeds were caring for only three sea lions the first week of...
  • USS Monitor Conservation Lab to close from funding woes

    Conservators at The Mariners' Museum were preparing to shut down a 5,000-square-foot treatment lab and stop work on the historic gun turret of the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor Thursday following the expiration of an agreement with the National Oceanic...
  • Florida keeps eye on possible El Nino

    Florida keeps eye on possible El Nino
    Will El NiƱo develop by this summer and potentially make for another relatively quiet hurricane season? Several forecast models say "there's an increasing chance" that could happen, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration....
  • Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach wins design award

    Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach wins design award
    A blend of bioluminescent life forms and splashy audiovisual recreations of their eerie haunts in the darkest depths of the ocean has earned the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach an international design award. The $560,000 Wonders of the Deep...
  • Two records broken on Baltimore's coldest day in nearly two decades

    Two records broken on Baltimore's coldest day in nearly two decades
    Tuesday was Baltimore's coldest day in 18 years, with temperatures cold enough to shatter two records, strain the region's electricity supply, fill homeless shelters and even render fire hydrants near a South Baltimore blaze useless. The air temperature...
  • In the Pipeline: Mysterious underwater outline has experts stumped

    In the Pipeline: Mysterious underwater outline has experts stumped
    It's a mystery that goes back at least to the mid-1980s, when a Sunset Beach diver named Greg Lacey first discovered what he called treasure tides. As the Los Angeles Times described in 1986, Lacey had been discovering lots of loot in the predawn surf,...
  • December snowstorms have some Northeasterners bracing for long winter

    December snowstorms have some Northeasterners bracing for long winter
    NEW YORK -- The groundhog may not make his prediction until February, but Karen Gregorski thinks she already knows how the coming winter is going to turn out: very, very snowy. Gregorski, 66, was walking carefully Tuesday down a midtown Manhattan...
  • Feds approve Navy's sonar training; environmentalists sue over whales

    The Navy's five year-plan to use sonar in training exercises off Southern California and Hawaii was approved Monday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. But several environmental groups, represented by San Francisco-based Earthjustice...
  • Stronger Laws Needed To Rebuild Fisheries

    For centuries, coastal communities in New England have relied upon a rich connection to the ocean and its bounty. Finfish such as cod and shad have supplied us with food, recreation and livelihoods for generations. At The Maritime Aquarium at Norwalk, one...
  • Rockfish quotas stir controversy

    Rockfish quotas stir controversy
    Sharing is often considered a good thing. But ask fishermen to share their catch, especially of Maryland's state fish, and things can get testy — with seafood consumers on the hook for how it plays out. Maryland is changing the way striped bass...
  • Coral reefs may be more adaptive to climate change than once thought

    Coral reefs may be more adaptive to climate change than once thought
    Scientists studying the catastrophic phenomena of coral bleaching have concluded that reef systems may be more adaptable to increasingly warmer oceans than previously believed. The study — published online in the journal Global Change Biology --...