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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

A collection of news and information related to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration published by this site and its partners.

Top National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Articles

Displaying items 12-22
  • Earth warms like a broken record; For 3rd time in 10 years, globe sets mark for hottest year

    For the third time in a decade, the globe sizzled to the hottest year on record, federal scientists announced Friday. Both the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and NASA calculated that in 2014 the world had its hottest year in 135 years of...
  • How hot was it? 2014 was Earth's warmest year on record, data show

    How hot was it? 2014 was Earth's warmest year on record, data show
    The average surface temperature on Earth was higher in 2014 than at any time since scientists began taking detailed measurements 135 years ago. The 1.4-degree Fahrenheit rise since 1880 confirms long-term warming patterns and renewed alarm about changes...
  • From the Boathouse: Whale watchers, report your sightings

    Ahoy! The beautiful weather is here, and I know all good boaters have made their New Year's resolutions. What kind of resolutions do boaters make? And do the resolutions last at least until spring thaw? Luckily Southern California's coastline doesn'...
  • Feds about to increase weather computing power tenfold, expect it to lead to better forecasts

    The National Weather Service is about to boost its computing power by more than tenfold, which officials hope will translate to better forecasts. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's two supercomputers will more than triple in...
  • Supercomputers to perform quadrillions of operations per second

    Supercomputers to perform quadrillions of operations per second
    Remember Hal, the naughty computer in the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey? Well, two government supercomputers are about to become scary too – scary powerful, that is. By this October, the supercomputers operated by the National Oceanic and...
  • Snow doesn't always fall from the sky

    Snow doesn't always fall from the sky
    Did you know that it snows – frequently – not all that far from South Florida? But it’s not the usual white flakes that fall from the sky. We’re talking about ocean snow, or the dead and decaying plants and animals that drift...
  • As globe pushed toward record heat in 2014, US only 34th warmest on record, not as disastrous

    On a day when much of the U.S. struggled with bone-chilling cold, federal meteorologists said America's weather in 2014 wasn't really that bad. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Thursday that the U.S. average temperature in...
  • Frigid weather grips much of U.S. as report shows warmer-than-usual 2014

    As much of the United States, particularly in the East and the Great Lakes region, suffered through nasty winter weather Thursday, the latest meteorological data show that 2014, at least, ranked high on the warm record charts.  The weather caused deadly...
  • Alaska's toasty temperatures in 2014 worry observers

    The biggest state in America, home to more ocean coastline than all others combined, has just set another record. This one, however, is nothing to cheer. For the first time in recorded history, temperatures in Anchorage did not drop below zero once in...
  • U.S. satellite spies holiday lights from space

    U.S. satellite spies holiday lights from space
    Americans are serious about their Christmas lights -- so much so that a NASA satellite can see them from space. The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership satellite, which NASA operates with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, can&...
  • Death of young killer whales raises worry about the species' survival

    He's trailed them and photographed them, mapped their family trees and counted their offspring, coming to identify individuals by their markings, sometimes even ascribing personalities based on behavior. For much of the past 40 years, the dean of San...