RSS feeds allow Web site content to be gathered via feed reader software. Click the subscribe link to obtain the feed URL for this page. The feed will update when new content appears on this page.

World War I (1914-1918)

A collection of news and information related to World War I (1914-1918) published by this site and its partners.

Top World War I (1914-1918) Articles

Displaying items 23-33
  • '@Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz' a powerful meditation on repression

    '@Large: Ai Weiwei on Alcatraz' a powerful meditation on repression
    Ilham Tohti, an economist and writer at Minzu University in Beijing, hosted the website Uighur Online, meant to encourage understanding between Han Chinese and ethnic Uighurs in the sprawling but remote northwestern region between Mongolia and Kazakhstan....
  • In Wales, a Bethlehem pilot is honored for World War II sacrifice

    In Wales, a Bethlehem pilot is honored for World War II sacrifice
    Douglas Brown graduated from Lehigh University in 1941, about six months before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor plunged America into World War II. The only son of a Lehigh professor of European history and an English mother, he belonged to an...
  • DP Buzz: Ebola

    Editor's note: "DP Buzz" is an interactive feature of the Daily Press Opinion Page. We email weekly questions on issues and topics affecting Peninsula-area citizens. Each week, subscribers can choose whether to weigh in or not with a short answer. Here is...
  • Family: Visit Lehigh Valley area museums for free Saturday

    Family: Visit Lehigh Valley area museums for free Saturday
    If you've been thinking about taking the family to check out one of the Lehigh Valley's local museums, there's no better day than Saturday. Entrance to 11 Lehigh Valley museums will be free Saturday as part of Museum Day Live! hosted by Smithsonian...
  • You want a war? Pay for it

     You want a war? Pay for it
    Young people may find it hard to believe, but going to war used to be a big deal. When the United States started bombing Iraq in January 1991, Americans somberly watched President George H.W. Bush address the nation and saw live video of Baghdad being...
  • Maureen Corrigan on 'So We Read On'

    Maureen Corrigan on 'So We Read On'
    Its greatness is right there in the title, not to mention on every page. But "The Great Gatsby," the 1925 masterpiece by F. Scott Fitzgerald, occupies an oddly precarious position in the ranks of Great American Novels. As a staple of high school...
  • Review: 'A Terrible Beauty' ★★★ 1/2

    Review: 'A Terrible Beauty' ★★★ 1/2
    "A Terrible Beauty," its title taken from a famous poem by W.B. Yeats and premiering at 8 p.m. Friday and 3 p.m. Sunday at the Siskel Film Center, is a docudrama of extraordinary power. It is about bullets flying and bodies falling, but it will capture...
  • Diana of the Dunes: Skinny-dipping socialite or environmentalist?

    Diana of the Dunes: Skinny-dipping socialite or environmentalist?
    On a Monday morning in July 1916, Tribune readers woke to find a curious story vying for Page 1 space with the latest news from World War I and a triple homicide in Lake Forest. A woman in her mid-30s named Alice Gray had eschewed civilization to live...
  • L.A. theater openings, Sept. 28-Oct. 5: 'The Call of Cthulhu' and more

    L.A. theater openings, Sept. 28-Oct. 5: 'The Call of Cthulhu' and more
    Untold terrors await in "The Call of Cthulhu," "Night of the Living Dead" and at Wicked Lit 2014. And on a lighter note, there's the nostalgia-fueled revue "Schoolhouse Rock Live!" Bright Star World premiere of Steve Martin and Edie Brickell’s new...
  • From 'fore' to flight

    From 'fore' to flight
    Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport was first a golf course. In fact, Southside Golf Course was Fort Lauderdale's first golf course, dating to the 1920s. The nine-hole course came on the presidential horizon in 1921, when President Warren...
  • Was Hartford 'The Richest City In The United States'?

    Was Hartford 'The Richest City In The United States'?
    Most magazine writers don't expect a few words thrown into an article to last more than a week or two in the public consciousness — certainly not to thrive into the next couple of centuries. But a sentence that Charles Hopkins Clark put into...