Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Arthur Miller, Feb. 10

Arthur Miller, the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright whose most famous fictional creation, Willy Loman in <I>Death of a Salesman</I>, came to symbolize the American Dream gone awry, died on Thursday, Feb. 10, 2005, at his home in Roxbury, Conn. He was 89. Miller, who had been hailed as America's greatest living playwright, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for <I>Death of a Salesman</I> in 1949, when he was just 33 years old. It took six weeks to write. His marriage to Marilyn Monroe in 1956, shown here, further catapulted the playwright to fame, though that was publicity he said he never pursued. In a 1992 interview with a French newspaper, he called her "highly self-destructive" and said that during their marriage, "all my energy and attention were devoted to trying to help her solve her problems. Unfortunately, I didn't have much success."

( AP, file / February 11, 2005 )

Arthur Miller, the Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright whose most famous fictional creation, Willy Loman in Death of a Salesman, came to symbolize the American Dream gone awry, died on Thursday, Feb. 10, 2005, at his home in Roxbury, Conn. He was 89. Miller, who had been hailed as America's greatest living playwright, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Death of a Salesman in 1949, when he was just 33 years old. It took six weeks to write. His marriage to Marilyn Monroe in 1956, shown here, further catapulted the playwright to fame, though that was publicity he said he never pursued. In a 1992 interview with a French newspaper, he called her "highly self-destructive" and said that during their marriage, "all my energy and attention were devoted to trying to help her solve her problems. Unfortunately, I didn't have much success."

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