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Charles Darwin

A collection of news and information related to Charles Darwin published by this site and its partners.

Top Charles Darwin Articles

Displaying items 45-55
  • Sex, gluttony and hoarding marked evolution of flowering plants

    Sex, gluttony and hoarding marked evolution of flowering plants
    Never mind the selfish gene – the cellular family history of the oldest living species of flowering plants is marked by enough sex and gluttony to earn a place in Shakespeare’s folio. The powerhouse organelles inside cells of Amborella...
  • Deborah Harkness' 'A Discovery of Witches' started with airport bookstores

    Deborah Harkness' 'A Discovery of Witches' started with airport bookstores
    Sometimes inspiration comes in the unlikeliest places. While vacationing in Puerto Vallarta in fall 2008, USC professor Deborah Harkness, a historian of science, was consumed with the upcoming bicentenary of Charles Darwin's birth, but the rest of the...
  • Word Play: Where the Wild Things still are

    Word Play: Where the Wild Things still are
    The idea of caring for the environment seems to be easier to get across to kids than to adults. Many adults just think the world is too complicated. "What difference does one light bulb or one plastic water bottle make in the wide world?" they think. For...
  • Travel Postcard: 48 hours in Cambridge, England

    CAMBRIDGE (Reuters) - Got 48 hours to explore the colleges, pubs, green spaces and leafy towpaths of Cambridge, England? Reuters correspondents with local knowledge help visitors get the most out of a visit to the city that is home to one of world's...
  • Close encounters in the Galapagos

    For close encounters of the furry, feathered, or scaly kind, there's no place on the planet quite like the Galapagos Islands. "You just see some of the craziest things," said Jonathan Brunger, operations manager for Adventure Life, a Montana company that...
  • 15 ways to see the world on water

    15 ways to see the world on water
    Three quarters of the world's surface is water, but nearly all of our vacations are based on land. It stands to reason that we must be missing out. Luckily there are some fantastic ways to see the wet face of the planet. 1. Explore the pristine coves of...
  • Hampton Roads pirates: College of William and Mary founded on pirate loot

    Hampton Roads pirates: College of William and Mary founded on pirate loot
    Few universities can look back on a history so venerable as the College of William and Mary. Chartered by royal decree in 1693, America's second oldest college soon became home to its first law school — and it educated so many Founding Fathers that...
  • Car review: Porsche 911 takes an evolutionary leap

    Car review: Porsche 911 takes an evolutionary leap
    One hundred years from now, when auto historians go all Charles Darwin dissecting the evolution of Porsche's 911 sports car, they may notice a bit of a dogleg in the year 2012. The car's progress since its inception in 1963 has been carefully modulated....
  • So much to see and do in London

    So much to see and do in London
    LONDON - The exterior of Westminster Abbey is imposing and grandiose. Our plan was simple: Pay the admission, stick our heads inside to see what it looked like, and then quickly duck out and move on to a museum. The museum never happened. That...
  • What's new in London since the last big royal wedding

    What's new in London since the last big royal wedding
    So you hate royal weddings. Or you love them. Or maybe you've caught yourself attending to arcane details of Prince William and Kate Middleton's plans for April 29, but you can't say exactly why. Here's one reason: They defy time. Start with just the...
  • Thomas Eisner dies at 81; entomologist who studied insect chemistry

    Thomas Eisner dies at 81; entomologist who studied insect chemistry
    Thomas Eisner, who became known as the "father of chemical ecology" as a result of his pioneering studies of how insects use chemicals to mate, elude predators and capture prey, died March 25 at his home in Ithaca, N.Y. He was 81 and had Parkinson's...