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Biology

A collection of news and information related to Biology published by this site and its partners.

Top Biology Articles

Displaying items 56-66
  • Science postdoc told to grin and bear prof's wandering eye

     Science postdoc told to grin and bear prof's wandering eye
    It's like they hired Princeton Mom over there at Science magazine. In a piece made famous for being both terrible advice and retracted, the magazine's Ask Alice columnist, virologist Alice Huang, counseled a postdoctoral student to grin and bear it when...
  • How do these jumping spiders see color? The secret is in their eyes

    How do these jumping spiders see color? The secret is in their eyes
    If a spider’s eight eyes don’t impress you, consider this: Some of them can even see in "true" color. Scientists have studied the vision in a group of brightly-hued jumping spiders and have finally discovered how their remarkable visual system...
  • Great white shark cruising East Coast becomes Twitter star

    Great white shark cruising East Coast becomes Twitter star
    They're gonna need a bigger Twitter. An organization studying great white sharks is enjoying some welcome attention after one of the creatures they've been monitoring started gaining a loyal social media following. @MaryLeeShark is the fake Twitter...
  • Researchers find 'virgin birth' in endangered sawfish

    MIAMI In a new study published Monday in the journal Current Biology, Stony Brook University researchers working with Florida scientists discovered seven endangered sawfish living in two rivers conceived through a process called parthenogenesis the...
  • Synthetic biology: Engineered cells detect diabetes and cancer

    SAN JOSE, Calif. A Stanford-designed project has built a startling new tool for diagnostic medicine: living biosensors made of bacteria that glow a particular color when they detect trouble. The team rewired the genetic circuitry inside bacterial cells...
  • Orland Park student pursues love of marine life in Hawaii

    Orland Park student pursues love of marine life in Hawaii
    Follow your dreams, wherever they may take you — even Hawaii! When then-7-year-old Ashley Horvath visited Florida, she took part in a Dolphin Adventure. As any 7-year-old will attest, it was the coolest thing ever. She told her parents, Geoff...
  • Imperiled bird, the greater sage grouse, is key to land preservation plan

    Imperiled bird, the greater sage grouse, is key to land preservation plan
    The greater sage grouse once numbered into the millions, but its population has shrunk to no more than hundreds of thousands as human developments have expanded across 10 western states. Now, the fate of the imperiled bird, is at the center of a...
  • Joan A. Steitz: A Place In The Lab, And In Biochemistry History

    Joan A. Steitz: A Place In The Lab, And In Biochemistry History
    Joan A. Steitz was a young biochemist in 1968, working with Francis Crick, the Nobel laureate credited with co-discovering the DNA double helix. And she needed a breakthrough. The early steps of her career had progressed ideally — including a Ph....
  • P-41: First large carnivore to be studied in the Verdugos

    P-41: First large carnivore to be studied in the Verdugos
    Johanna Turner, a sound effects editor for Universal Studios, joined the ranks of citizen scientists years ago, placing remote cameras in the San Gabriel Mountains to record the movements of wildlife. After the 2009 Station fire tore through the San...
  • Meet the Verdugo Mountains' very own mountain lion: P-41

    Meet the Verdugo Mountains' very own mountain lion: P-41
    Johanna Turner, a sound effects editor for Universal Studios, joined the ranks of citizen scientists years ago, placing remote cameras in the San Gabriel Mountains to record the movements of wildlife. After the 2009 Station fire tore through the San...
  • Army chief: Human error likely not cause of anthrax mistake

    Army chief: Human error likely not cause of anthrax mistake
    The U.S. Army's top general said Thursday that human error probably was not a factor in the Army's mistaken shipment of live anthrax samples from a chemical weapons testing site that was opened more than 70 years ago in a desolate stretch of desert in...