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Biology

A collection of news and information related to Biology published by this site and its partners.

Top Biology Articles

Displaying items 56-66
  • A flock of genomes tells the tale of bird evolution

    A new genetic map of nearly all living birds has shaken the avian evolutionary tree, scattering some species to new perches and adding odd flourishes to their tales. Parrots roost closer to songbirds, a tiny wren shares a murderous lineage with the...
  • Tree sap turns table on bug trap plant

    Tree sap turns table on bug trap plant
    Some 40 million years ago around the Baltic Sea coast, an insect-killing plant was busy trapping bugs. Its leaves, about as long as a pencil eraser, eventually fell into sticky sap, which hardened to amber and stayed there until miners scooped it up,...
  • Inside The Lab: The Race To Create An Ebola Vaccine

    Inside The Lab: The Race To Create An Ebola Vaccine
    MERIDEN — Rick Chubet paces from machine to machine inside a clean, white lab at Protein Sciences. The vaccine scientist pulls up to a monitor displaying fresh results from a test. Two lines, one blue, one red, cut across a graph. He walks to...
  • Bear cubs killed in collision in Orange County

    Bear cubs killed in collision in Orange County
    When two bear cubs were hit and killed Friday night on Kelly Park Road, wildlife biologists worried about their mama. She was not with the two little bears when they died. Rather than take the cubs away, officers with the Florida Fish & Wildlife...
  • Elementary, Watson, you're wrong on race. Go ahead, sell your Nobel medal.

     Elementary, Watson, you're wrong on race. Go ahead, sell your Nobel medal.
    James Watson is one of the most important scientists of the 20th century. He is also a peevish bigot. History will remember him for his co-discovery of the structure of DNA, in 1953. This week, Watson is ensuring that history, or at least the introduction...
  • Nova wins $8.5 million grant to study Gulf of Mexico

    Nova wins $8.5 million grant to study Gulf of Mexico
    A fund established by the British oil company BP after the catastrophic 2010 spill in the Gulf of Mexico has awarded Nova Southeastern University $8.5 million for research projects. A team led by the university's highly regarded Oceanographic Center...
  • Native lizard hangs tight with rapid evolution

    Native lizard hangs tight with rapid evolution
    Anybody who has lived or played in Florida likely has been called out by a finger-long lizard that taunts people with bold stares, push-ups and throat flexing. Aggressive, tough and foreign, those Cuban brown anoles also throw attitude at their close...
  • When it comes to DNA, crocodiles and birds flock together

    When it comes to DNA, crocodiles and birds flock together
    If you really want to know about birds, you have to consider the crocodile. That point was driven home this week with the release of the genomes of 45 bird species, which reassigned some perches on the avian evolutionary tree and included some seemingly...
  • Colombia condor conservation program lacks hard numbers

    Colombia condor conservation program lacks hard numbers
    Their wings spanning 10 feet or more as they glide serenely above Colombia's Andes, condors are majestic physical specimens. They have been important symbols here since pre-colonial times, when indigenous tribes saw them as messengers of the gods and...
  • Thomas A. Cebula, microbiologist and JHU professor

    Thomas A. Cebula, microbiologist and JHU professor
    Thomas A. Cebula, a lauded microbiologist who helped develop ways to speed up the identification of dangerous pathogens and taught as a visiting professor at the Johns Hopkins University, died Wednesday at Union Memorial Hospital following a heart attack....
  • Study: Parent-infant communication differs by gender shortly after birth

    Study: Parent-infant communication differs by gender shortly after birth
    Mothers are more likely to respond to their infant's vocal cues than fathers, and infants respond preferentially to mother's voice, according to a new study. Researchers also found that mothers may be more likely to vocalize back and forth with female...