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Biology

A collection of news and information related to Biology published by this site and its partners.

Top Biology Articles

Displaying items 34-44
  • Dolphin die-off recedes, but Unusual Mortality Event lingers along East Coast

    Dolphin die-off recedes, but Unusual Mortality Event lingers along East Coast
    Last year, Virginia witnessed the worst mass dolphin die-off in its history as more than 300 bottlenose dolphins began stranding — about five times the annual average. Marine biologists were flummoxed. They suspected a deadly morbillivirus, and...
  • Congressional panel critical of federal plan to list bat species as endangered

     Congressional panel critical of federal plan to list bat species as endangered
    HARRISBURG — The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service is debating whether to list the northern long-eared bat as an endangered species because a fungal disease has wiped out 99 percent of the colonies that hibernate in one spot. And Republican members...
  • Wisconsin's fall hunting season kicks off this week

    The woods and fields of Wisconsin are only beginning to offer hints, but a new season is coming. Soon the sumacs, maples and hickories will be ablaze in the colors of autumn. Deer will exchange their red coats of summer for a warmer, brown model. And the...
  • DNR exploring 'adaptive management' plan to increase size of panfish

    One of my favorite public sculptures in Wisconsin is a 15-foot-tall rendition of a bluegill near Onalaska, the "sunfish capital of the world." It represents both the exaggerated fish of our dreams and the magnitude of our actual love for panfish. The...
  • Clever trout rival chimpanzees at choosing good allies, study finds

    Clever trout rival chimpanzees at choosing good allies, study finds
    Don’t play games with the coral trout – it might just outmaneuver you. These fish appear to be just as skilled as chimpanzees at picking the best, most able allies to help them nab some food, new research shows. The findings, described in...
  • Marking 100 years since Martha, the last of the passenger pigeons, died

    Friday evening, people gathered to remember Martha. She was a star in her day. Scarlet eyes and peach-colored breast. Head held high. Toward the end of her life, people lined up to see her a glimpse for the ages. But a hundred years ago Monday,...
  • Prickless blood sugar test on horizon for diabetics

    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Eventually, people with diabetes won't need to prick their fingers multiple times a day to check their blood sugar levels, if researchers have their way. Sylvia Daunert and her lab team at the University of Miami in...
  • Meet the genes in the beans of your coffee

    Meet the genes in the beans of your coffee
    Wake up and smell the genome. Researchers have pieced together the genetic atlas of the parent of the most commonly cultivated species of coffee plant and uncovered a rather independent streak in its evolution. ----------- FOR THE RECORD An...
  • Science fiction roundup: 'Lock In,' others

    Science fiction roundup: 'Lock In,' others
    Lock In by John Scalzi, Tor, 336 pages, $24.99 John Scalzi is best known for his "Old Man's War" series of military space operas and his Hugo-winning parody of science fiction clichés "Redshirts," so the gritty near-future police procedural "Lock In"...
  • New Field Museum exhibit brings ancient Madagascar to life

    New Field Museum exhibit brings ancient Madagascar to life
    More than just the setting for a fanciful cartoon movie, Madagascar, of course, is a real island boasting some of the most fascinating biological history on Earsth. A new Field Museum exhibition, opening Saturday, tries to tell some of that story --...
  • Study discovers households marked by 'signature' bacteria

    Study discovers households marked by 'signature' bacteria
    Families and roommates share plenty — food, bathrooms, dishes. A study published Thursday adds a less visible but ubiquitous item to the list: bacteria. Households carry a common community of bacteria, populating surfaces such as doorknobs,...