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Science

A collection of news and information related to Science published by this site and its partners.

Top Science Articles

Displaying items 56-66
  • Warrior or nanny? Social spiders' personalities match their jobs

    Warrior or nanny? Social spiders' personalities match their jobs
    If you thought spiders weren’t scary enough on their own, maybe it’s time to meet the social spiders – eight-legged creepy crawlers who actually live in colonies and raise their young together. Scientists studying these spiders with a...
  • Rats feel regret? Well, I feel ... skeptical.

    Researchers this week revealed that rats feel regret. So, does this mean we’re going to be getting an apology for that whole Black Death deal? OK, probably not. University of Minnesota researchers this week published the results of their...
  • Mexico boasts a staggering genetic diversity, study shows

    Mexico boasts a staggering genetic diversity, study shows
    Writers, artists and historians have long pondered what it means to be Mexican. Now science has offered its answer, and it could change how medicine uses racial and ethnic categories to assess disease risk, testing and treatment. The broadest analysis...
  • Share of CSU students who now have healthcare exceeds expectations

    Share of CSU students who now have healthcare exceeds expectations
    New data show the number of students without health insurance on California State University campuses dropped by 60% after Obamacare enrollment, defying concerns that not enough young people would sign up for health insurance. The Affordable Care Act,...
  • Dinosaurs were neither cold-blooded nor warm-blooded, study finds

    Dinosaurs were neither cold-blooded nor warm-blooded, study finds
    Dinosaurs have long been thought of as slow, lumbering, cold-blooded animals, akin to reptiles like the crocodile and the lizard – but there’s been increasing signs in recent years that they may have been warm-blooded, as mammals and birds...
  • Wood-aged cheese: How science slices the debate over bacteria

    Wood-aged cheese: How science slices the debate over bacteria
    So what's the big stink over wood-aged cheese anyway? Is it deadly or just delicious? Artisanal cheese-makers raised a fuss recently when an FDA official suggested that wooden cheese shelves posed a public health risk because they were not "adequately...
  • A wrinkle in time: Finding the ice age in urban Los Angeles

    A wrinkle in time: Finding the ice age in urban Los Angeles
    Just beyond the traffic and palm trees of Wilshire Boulevard, hidden beneath the shadows of nondescript office buildings, lie the tar-slicked bones of many thousand long-dead creatures. These unfortunates found themselves mired in the sticky bitumen...
  • Colorado River researchers find signs of ancient, devastating floods

    Colorado River researchers find signs of ancient, devastating floods
    Scientists say it would have been a catastrophe of unprecedented proportions. If the Glen Canyon Dam had failed, it would have changed the lives of millions of people and reshaped the history of the American West. Only a lucky break in the weather...
  • Tibetans get high-altitude edge from extinct Denisovans' genes

    Forget climbing Mt. Everest — for most humans, just eking out a living on the harsh Tibetan plateau is challenge enough. But Tibetan people have thrived there for thousands of years, and a new study says it's thanks to a genetic adaptation they...
  • Southland falls short of achieving 20% voluntary cut in water use

    Southland falls short of achieving 20% voluntary cut in water use
    Southern Californians have fallen far short of achieving the 20% voluntary cut in water use sought by Gov. Jerry Brown in the face of the deep drought afflicting every corner of the state. A recent statewide survey found that urban water use in...
  • Dinosaur hunter is making prehistory

    Dinosaur hunter is making prehistory
    Scott Richardson is up at dawn, standing atop a rocky ridgeline near his base camp, a solitary figure in the slanting light. He surveys a primordial wilderness of dry creek beds and stands of juniper and pinyon pine. "This is dinosaur country," he says,...