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Science

A collection of news and information related to Science published by this site and its partners.

Top Science Articles

Displaying items 45-55
  • Private donors commit $65 million to studying youth concussions

    Private donors commit $65 million to studying youth concussions
    With the focus on concussions in young athletes intensifying across the nation, the White House on Wednesday unveiled a raft of initiatives aimed at preventing mild traumatic brain injury and improving its diagnosis and treatment in children. Readying...
  • One day, we could have super beer, thanks to scientists' study of yeast

    One day, we could have super beer, thanks to scientists' study of yeast
    The most critical ingredient in beer is also the least understood. Without the biological marvel that is Saccharomyces cerevisiae -- brewer’s yeast -- beer would simply be grainy soda pop, but brewers didn’t even know that yeast existed...
  • New Mexico forecast: Cloudy with a 100% chance of grasshoppers

    New Mexico forecast: Cloudy with a 100% chance of grasshoppers
    An unusually warm winter has left Albuquerque with an army of grasshoppers, who are now flying high enough to mess with weather radar readings. With more eggs able to survive winter and hatch this spring, grasshoppers reached a point of infestation,...
  • Frog tongues flick with power and stick with ease

    Frog tongues flick with power and stick with ease
    Every predator needs to catch its prey. We humans use our hands, sharks and wolves use their jaws, but a few animals like frogs use something much stranger: their tongue. To understand just how frogs snatch their snacks, scientists made the first direct...
  • Rats feel regret? Well, I feel ... skeptical.

    Researchers this week revealed that rats feel regret. So, does this mean we’re going to be getting an apology for that whole Black Death deal? OK, probably not. University of Minnesota researchers this week published the results of their...
  • Mexico boasts a staggering genetic diversity, study shows

    Mexico boasts a staggering genetic diversity, study shows
    Writers, artists and historians have long pondered what it means to be Mexican. Now science has offered its answer, and it could change how medicine uses racial and ethnic categories to assess disease risk, testing and treatment. The broadest analysis...
  • Army Corps to recommend $1-billion L.A. River project

    Army Corps to recommend $1-billion L.A. River project
    Federal officials gave a major boost Wednesday to the city's plans to turn the Los Angeles River into an urban oasis for recreation and an inviting locale for new commercial and residential development. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said it has...
  • Rain of asteroids melted early Earth, boiled its oceans, study shows

    Rain of asteroids melted early Earth, boiled its oceans, study shows
    When you look up at the moon’s pockmarked face, you’re actually staring at Earth’s early history. The rain of asteroids that pummeled the lunar surface hit our planet too — it’s just that erosion and plate tectonics blotted...
  • Indulge your inner kitchen geek: Genuine Ideas is the place

    Indulge your inner kitchen geek: Genuine Ideas is the place
    Have you ever wanted to stick a thermocouple in a carrot and chart the rate at which it heats in a steamer, in a pot of boiling water and in a hot oven? Does the phrase “latent heat of condensation” fill your heart with joy? Boy, are you...
  • During penalty shootouts, goalies fall prey to 'gambler's fallacy'

    During penalty shootouts, goalies fall prey to 'gambler's fallacy'
    Penalty kick shootouts are not a goalkeeper’s favorite way to settle a soccer match. Alone in the net, goalies must face off against a string of kickers and try to anticipate which way the ball will come hurtling toward the goal. Psychologists...
  • Seals connect the dots to feed in offshore wind farms

    Seals connect the dots to feed in offshore wind farms
    As wind farms march out into coastal waters to meet energy demands, seals are learning to use them like local grocery stores, scientists say. A few wily individuals have been spotted prowling the grids of turbines, checking for fish congregating around...