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Science

A collection of news and information related to Science published by this site and its partners.

Top Science Articles

Displaying items 45-55
  • Indulge your inner kitchen geek: Genuine Ideas is the place

    Indulge your inner kitchen geek: Genuine Ideas is the place
    Have you ever wanted to stick a thermocouple in a carrot and chart the rate at which it heats in a steamer, in a pot of boiling water and in a hot oven? Does the phrase “latent heat of condensation” fill your heart with joy? Boy, are you...
  • During penalty shootouts, goalies fall prey to 'gambler's fallacy'

    During penalty shootouts, goalies fall prey to 'gambler's fallacy'
    Penalty kick shootouts are not a goalkeeper’s favorite way to settle a soccer match. Alone in the net, goalies must face off against a string of kickers and try to anticipate which way the ball will come hurtling toward the goal. Psychologists...
  • U.S. reverses proposal to list wolverine as threatened species

    U.S. reverses proposal to list wolverine as threatened species
    A U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service official has ordered federal biologists to withdraw their conclusion that the last 300 wolverines in the continental United States deserve threatened species status. The biologists had recommended the protection on...
  • Mantis shrimp wear tinted shades to see UV light

    Mantis shrimp wear tinted shades to see UV light
    When you look at a mantis shrimp, you see a vivid lobster-like crustacean whose forearms can strike with the force of a .22-caliber bullet. But when a mantis shrimp looks at you, we have no idea what it sees. That’s because the mantis shrimp...
  • When brain says buy, you may not know why

    Billions of neurons fire in the brains of stock market traders as they decide whether to buy or sell shares in a matter of seconds. Some of these brain waves produce rational calculations about how best to make a profit, but others may not, suggests new...
  • Smooth surfaces help make cities into sizzling urban heat islands

    Smooth surfaces help make cities into sizzling urban heat islands
    Nineteen years ago this month, Chicago experienced one of the worst heat waves in its history. Nearly 500 people, mostly poor and elderly residents of the city’s dense urban core,  perished in sweltering temperatures and oppressive humidity. The...
  • Seals connect the dots to feed in offshore wind farms

    Seals connect the dots to feed in offshore wind farms
    As wind farms march out into coastal waters to meet energy demands, seals are learning to use them like local grocery stores, scientists say. A few wily individuals have been spotted prowling the grids of turbines, checking for fish congregating around...
  • On Santa Cruz Island, rising seas present archaeological emergency

    On Santa Cruz Island, rising seas present archaeological emergency
    Archaeologist Torben Rick watched with frustration as pounding surf clawed at one of North America's oldest homesteads, a massive heap of village foundations, cutting tools, beads and kitchen discards left behind over the last 13,000 years. Here,...
  • About half of kids' learning ability is in their DNA, study says

    About half of kids' learning ability is in their DNA, study says
    You may think you’re better at reading than you are at math (or vice versa), but new research suggests you’re probably equally good (or bad) at both. The reason: The genes that determine a person’s ability to tackle one subject influence...
  • To change attitudes, don't argue — agree, extremely

    To change attitudes, don't argue — agree, extremely
    What if the best way to change minds isn’t to tell people why they’re wrong, but to tell them why they’re right? Scientists tried this recently and discovered that agreeing with people can be a surprisingly powerful way to shake up...
  • Scientists follow magma from Earth's belly to base of Mt. Rainier

    Scientists follow magma from Earth's belly to base of Mt. Rainier
    The lava that spews from the fiery rims of volcanoes originates deep in Earth’s crust, often more than 50 miles below our feet. Although scientists have a general idea where this magma comes from, it’s nearly impossible to see exactly what&...