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Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (18011809), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. The Louisiana Purchase (1803) and the Lewis and Clark Expedition (18041806) occurred during his presidency.

Jefferson was a man of the Enlightenment and favored states' rights and a very limited federal government. Jefferson supported the separation of church and state and was the author of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom (1779, 1786). He was the wartime Governor of Virginia (17791781)...
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Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (18011809), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. The Louisiana Purchase (1803) and the Lewis and Clark Expedition (18041806) occurred during his presidency.

Jefferson was a man of the Enlightenment and favored states' rights and a very limited federal government. Jefferson supported the separation of church and state and was the author of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom (1779, 1786). He was the wartime Governor of Virginia (17791781), the first United States Secretary of State (17891793) and second Vice President (17971801).

Jefferson's estate, Monticello, and the univerisy he founded in 1819 -- the University of Virginia -- are located in Charlottesville, VA. U.Va. was the first university in the U.S. where higher education was completely separate from religious doctrine. Jefferson is also known for many inventions, such as the moldboard plow, wheel cipher and portable copying press.
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Top Thomas Jefferson Articles

Displaying items 78-88
  • In 'Gleam,' testing limits and breaking traditions

    In 'Gleam,' testing limits and breaking traditions
    Watching "Gleam" at Center Stage is like visiting a distant era that actually wasn't all that long ago. This play takes place between 1903 and 1928 in a rural Florida town. Its residents' customs and speech patterns seem closer to 19th-century...
  • Roe v. Wade turns 39

    January 22 marks the 39th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the landmark decision that has legalized the death of millions of American unborn babies. What must God do to a nation that methodically murders a huge portion of an entire generation of its own...
  • Quirky and unusual

    Quirky and unusual
    Awkward Family Pet Photos Mike Bender and Doug Chernack Three Rivers Press, $15, paper The guys who brought us "Awkward Family Photos" are back with an edition devoted to cruel and unusual punishment to animals. Sort of. It's not that we don't love our...
  • 12 places to visit in 2012

    12 places to visit in 2012
    New Mexico: This year, New Mexicans mark 100 years of statehood. But much of the state's appeal stems from its human history that goes back much further. (In 2010, Santa Fe celebrated 400 years of cityhood.) Explore here: the adobe architecture and art...
  • On Faith: An obligation to live and speak the truth

    Years ago, while I was visiting a South American city's cathedral at a time when the country was under a brutal military regime, I overheard a tour guide complaining to his tour group that there were members of the clergy preaching politics. This was not...
  • 10 things you might not know about salt

    10 things you might not know about salt
    Every winter, widespread chemical dumping leaves Chicago streets covered in sodium chloride. Here are 10 facts you don't have to take with a grain of salt: 1. Salt has seasoned English in many ways. Because Romans put salt or brine on their vegetables,...
  • Rachel Maddow and my lesson in civility

    Rachel Maddow and my lesson in civility
    When one writes about moral convictions, it's probably a good idea to consistently live up to them. That way people can still disagree with your convictions, but they have a difficult time accusing you of hypocrisy. Last week at the Conservative...
  • Students learn the basics of book publishing

    Students learn the basics of book publishing
    Wearing a chef’s hat and apron, children’s book author Mary Ann Fraser stood at the front of a first-grade classroom at Lincoln Elementary School on Thursday and told the students that it was time to cook up a story. Within minutes, they had...
  • Judges' pay in Maryland ranks near the bottom nationally

    The independent Judicial Compensation Commission recently reported its findings to the Maryland General Assembly, which presented them to the Senate and House of Delegates in the form of Joint Resolutions. Our state's judges have not received a raise...
  • Hopkins' medical students learn to use their stethoscopes

    Hopkins' medical students learn to use their stethoscopes
    The stethoscope may be an icon of the medical profession to most patients. But it's more of a relic to many doctors. The device used to listen to the heart, lungs and other body parts — invented nearly 200 years ago — has been overtaken by...
  • Mr. Santorum's misapprehension

    Rick Santorum, who appears to have taken this week's lead in the race for the Republican nomination for the presidency, accused President Obama the other day of following a "phony theology," elevating earth above humankind. On Face the Nation yesterday,...