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Richard J. Daley

Richard J. Daley
Richard J. Daley was mayor of Chicago from 21 years, from 1955 to 1976. During that time, he headed a vast Democratic political machine. He died unexpectedly at age 74 on Dec. 20, 1976, when he had a heart attack during a visit to his doctor's office. Daley had been mayor longer than anyone else, and his death came as a shock to a generation of Chicagoans who could remember no other mayor. He was often described as the last of the big city bosses ruling over the last of the big city political machines. But he was also an expert on municipal government and especially city finance. He was the most powerful Democrat in Illinois and the most influential mayor in the nation. His son, Richard M. D... Show more »
Richard J. Daley was mayor of Chicago from 21 years, from 1955 to 1976. During that time, he headed a vast Democratic political machine. He died unexpectedly at age 74 on Dec. 20, 1976, when he had a heart attack during a visit to his doctor's office. Daley had been mayor longer than anyone else, and his death came as a shock to a generation of Chicagoans who could remember no other mayor. He was often described as the last of the big city bosses ruling over the last of the big city political machines. But he was also an expert on municipal government and especially city finance. He was the most powerful Democrat in Illinois and the most influential mayor in the nation. His son, Richard M. Daley, was first elected mayor in 1989 and won a sixth term in 2007. « Show less

Top Richard J. Daley Articles

Displaying items 89-99
  • December 2 - Author Jeff Davis

    December 2 - Author Jeff Davis
    Chicago Bears: Yesterday and Today CELEBRATE YESTERDAY AND TODAY'S MONSTERS OF THE MIDWAY WITH CHICAGO BEARS: YESTERDAY AND TODAY Chicagoans are passionate about many things, from the food they love to the wildest politics anywhere USA. Most talk and...
  • Eunice Kennedy Shriver, Mother Of California's First Lady, Dies

    Eunice Kennedy Shriver, Mother Of California's First Lady, Dies
    Eunice Kennedy Shriver, whose advocacy for the mentally disabled helped bring people with special needs into the mainstream of American life, has died. She was 88. Shriver, the sister of President Kennedy and Sen. Edward M. Kennedy and the mother of...
  • 10 things you might not know about dirty politics

    10 things you might not know about dirty politics
    It's that season again, when the dead return to life. We're not talking about Halloween--we mean Election Day, when ghost voters haunt the land. Here are 10 examples of political dirty tricks: 1. When unscrupulous British political operatives show up...
  • Part 6: 10 things you might not know about Chicago's south suburbs

    Part 6: 10 things you might not know about Chicago's south suburbs
    Our six-part series on Chicago's neighborhoods and suburbs concludes with a salute to the southland. 1/ Thornton goes way back. An 1840 map of the area shows Chicago, "Napierville" (Naperville), "Juliet" (Joliet) – and Thornton. And the nearby...
  • Hey good lookin'!

    We sure don't like our wrinkles! After the on anti-aging goos, readers want to join the conversation. Thanks for your suggestions on other things to try (or reject). In the interest of all of us who want to remain young, here you go: Anna Gunter Kaplan,...
  • NO APOLOGIES, NO REGRETS

    Jane Byrne, the Mt. St. Helens of City Hall, is spouting off-again-on every topic imaginable, from politics to pantyhose. The tiny, blond dynamo always has an opinion. It might not be the same as yesterday's opinion, but . . . THAT'S THE GIST of the...
  • Mayors agree on immigrants' value

    Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani said America needs to remain open to immigrants, while mayors from around the world called immigration a "net benefit" to cities, at a forum Tuesday in Chicago. Newcomers make cities stronger, enrich a city's culture...
  • Books editor's job is no easy read

    In a tiny 5th floor room in Tribune Tower lies a treasure trove of literature: more than 800 books that literary editor Elizabeth Taylor might consider for a coveted review in the Tribune’s Books section. The books are everywhere in the room, and not...
  • Beauties and beasts

    The Loop is a visual feast of world-famous buildings, but it also offers rare cases of aesthetic indigestion. LOVELIEST: 1. Monadnock Building, 53 W. Jackson Blvd. -- An unadorned wonder, with thick brick walls that curve inward and upward to suggest an...
  • It all starts downtown

    The history of the Loop begins with a mystery. Does the synonym for Chicago's downtown date from 1897, when the elevated train circle was completed? Or did it start a decade and a half earlier? Many historians and present-day guidebooks have asserted...
  • Was there a Dearborn? A landmarks primer

    Burnham Hotel: Daniel Burnham, a visionary architect and urban planner, was the chief of construction and director of works of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893 and co-author of the far-sighted 1909 Plan of Chicago. Carson Pirie Scott &...