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Richard J. Daley

Richard J. Daley
Richard J. Daley was mayor of Chicago from 21 years, from 1955 to 1976. During that time, he headed a vast Democratic political machine. He died unexpectedly at age 74 on Dec. 20, 1976, when he had a heart attack during a visit to his doctor's office. Daley had been mayor longer than anyone else, and his death came as a shock to a generation of Chicagoans who could remember no other mayor. He was often described as the last of the big city bosses ruling over the last of the big city political machines. But he was also an expert on municipal government and especially city finance. He was the most powerful Democrat in Illinois and the most influential mayor in the nation. His son, Richard M. D... Show more »
Richard J. Daley was mayor of Chicago from 21 years, from 1955 to 1976. During that time, he headed a vast Democratic political machine. He died unexpectedly at age 74 on Dec. 20, 1976, when he had a heart attack during a visit to his doctor's office. Daley had been mayor longer than anyone else, and his death came as a shock to a generation of Chicagoans who could remember no other mayor. He was often described as the last of the big city bosses ruling over the last of the big city political machines. But he was also an expert on municipal government and especially city finance. He was the most powerful Democrat in Illinois and the most influential mayor in the nation. His son, Richard M. Daley, was first elected mayor in 1989 and won a sixth term in 2007. « Show less

Top Richard J. Daley Articles

Displaying items 23-33
  • Where next to put the Daley name?

     
    Today's column discusses the city's upcoming decision on how best to honor the late Maggie Daley by putting her name on something. But a bigger question looms: What, ultimately, should bear the name of her husband, Richard M. Daley, the......
  • Saul, folks

     
    UPDATED with many new links: Saul Alinsky, really? What small percentage of Americans knows enough about Saul Alinsky to understand Newt Gingrich's continual use of his name to slur President Barack Obama? A list of recent commentaries and relevant...
  • Boundary violation

     
    Protesters crossed the line earlier this week when they marched on Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel's North Side home. I don't mean the legal line, though the demonstrators, who marched peacefully to express their anger over plans to close seven public......
  • The Zorn/Thayer papers

     
    My Wednesday print column pulls portions out of the following e-mail dialogue (lightly edited) I had with Andy Thayer, local veteran activist and spokesman for the Coalition Against NATO/G-8 War & Poverty Agenda: To Andy: I’d like to do short......
  • By George, ‘Leighton Courthouse’ shows how to play the naming game

     
    George N. Leighton, 6/29/2012. Tribune photo by Terence Antonio James In a startling break with tradition, Cook County has just named its central courthouse after former Judge George N. Leighton. The tradition I’m referring to isn’t the long-...
  • Newsman scrootens his archives to find Daley's 'Greatest Hits'

     
    Wednesday's print column. Of all the nuggets of Richard M. Daley's wit and wisdom that veteran WLS-AM 890 political reporter Bill Cameron unearthed in a recent search of his audio vault, my favorite is this: What really makes narcotics so......
  • Theater review: ‘Early and Often’ at Open Fist Theatre

     
    Philip Brandes reviews the political satire "Early and Often" at the Open Fist Theatre....
  • AT PEACE, AT LAST: AFTER 11 YEARS AND AN EMOTIONAL PARADE, VIETNAM VETS FINALLY FEEL WELCOME

    AT PEACE, AT LAST: AFTER 11 YEARS AND AN EMOTIONAL PARADE, VIETNAM VETS FINALLY FEEL WELCOME
    This story by William Mullen orginally ran in the Aug. 17, 1986, Tribune Sunday Magazine.    At 9:30 a.m. on Friday, June 13, three men left the entrance to Navy Pier and began moving west along Grand Avenue. The three were old soldiers, the point men...
  • A truly foul, nasty river ran through it

    A truly foul, nasty river  ran through it
    Cleaning up the Chicago River, a waterway engineered to flow backward and lined with dozens of sewage pipes, has always been a tough fight. At the turn of the last century, officials reversed the river and started sending Chicago's waste toward the...
  • Ashburn thriving on a strong sense of community

    Ashburn thriving on a strong sense of community
    When Greg Lis and his friends were growing up in the 1950s and wanted to play baseball, they'd head over to Cinder Field, a vacant lot in the Southwest Side neighborhood of Ashburn, and choose sides for a pick-up game. Lis, vice president of Americorp...
  • Emotional Daley leads last St. Patrick's parade as mayor

    Emotional Daley leads last St. Patrick's parade as mayor
    For the last time in his 22 years of office, Mayor Richard Daley hoisted an Irish-style walking stick above his head Saturday at the annual St. Patrick’s Day parade that his father inaugurated in 1956. It was an emotional experience, for Daley...