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Voting Rights Act of 1965

A collection of news and information related to Voting Rights Act of 1965 published by this site and its partners.

Top Voting Rights Act of 1965 Articles

Displaying items 1-11
  • A tribute to Notre Dame's Father Ted Hesburgh

    A tribute to Notre Dame's Father Ted Hesburgh
    It was October 1965. My friend David White, an Irish Catholic kid from Boston, and I, a black Catholic kid from many places, were having one of those earnest, post-midnight conversations that college kids have — I hope they still do — about...
  • Oscars 2015: Academy tries to highlight diversity onstage

    Oscars 2015: Academy tries to highlight diversity onstage
    “Tonight we honor Hollywood’s best and whitest. Sorry, brightest,” quipped host Neil Patrick Harris in his opening remarks onstage at the 87th Academy Awards on Sunday night. Harris was poking fun at a perceived lack of diversity...
  • Lehigh Valley's influence is felt on the Oscars

    Lehigh Valley's influence is felt on the Oscars
    There are no Lehigh Valley filmmakers in the running for Oscars this year, unlike 2014, when former Parkland High School student Chris Renaud was a nominee as director of "Despicable Me 2." But that doesn't mean that there aren't a lot of local...
  • At Dr. Phillips Center, 'A Vote: A Voice' celebrates 50th anniversary of Voting Rights Act

    The voices of local African-Americans who fought for civil rights in Central Florida can be heard in the original play "A Vote: A Voice." Written by Florida state Sen. Geraldine F. Thompson, D-Orlando, "A Vote: A Voice" will be peformed at 3 and 7 p.m....
  • Donald P. Russo: 'Selma' Oscar snub, success of 'Sniper' upset liberals

    Donald P. Russo: 'Selma' Oscar snub, success of 'Sniper' upset liberals
    Brittney Cooper's recent article in the fashionable leftist online magazine, Salon, excoriated New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd for her column criticizing the movie "Selma." According to Cooper, Dowd's primary offense was her alleged cultural...
  • Their auntie, Rosa Parks: memories and recipes

    Their auntie, Rosa Parks: memories and recipes
    When Rosa Parks refused to relinquish her seat to a white passenger on a segregated bus in December 1955, she would go down in history as the symbolic "mother" of the civil rights movement. Parks was also a beloved mother figure to her large extended...
  • Leonard Pitts: Thanks to judge, Ala. adds to bigot history

    In June, it will be 52 years since George Wallace stood in the schoolhouse door. It happened at the University of Alabama, where two African-American students, Vivian Malone and James Hood, were attempting to register. In facing down three federal...
  • Judge Roy Moore stands on the wrong side of history ... again

    In June, it will be 52 years since George Wallace stood in the schoolhouse door. It happened at the University of Alabama, where two African-American students, Vivian Malone and James Hood, were attempting to register. In facing down three federal...
  • 50 years after Watts, African Americans still feel caught between violent crime and the police

    50 years after Watts, African Americans still feel caught between violent crime and the police
    The new City Council member representing Los Angeles' 8th District will take office on July 1, just a month and a few days short of the 50th anniversary of the Watts riots. Around the nation, 1965 is celebrated as the year of the historic march from...
  • Wim Wenders applies 3D to drama in new movie completed just in time for Berlin festival

    Wim Wenders has made a new foray into 3D with his drama "Every Thing Will Be Fine," which he got ready just in time for its premiere Tuesday at the Berlin International Film Festival. The movie, starring James Franco, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Richard...
  • Gay marriage comes to Alabama over chief justice's objections; 'unlawful federal authority'

    Alabama's chief justice built his career on defiance: In 2003, Roy Moore was forced from the bench for disobeying a federal court order to remove a boulder-size Ten Commandments monument from the state courthouse. On Monday, as Alabama became the 37th...