Off the court, Grant Hill's main game is collecting African-American art. Inspired by his parent's personal collection and passion, he began purchasing mixed media, paintings and sculpture in 1995. His love for different mediums is showcased in the "Something All Our Own" exhibit at the Orlando Museum of Art.

The forty-five works by African-American artists include collages, lithographs, mixed media, oil and watercolor paintings, sculptures and other art forms. The exhibit's title is taken from the Margaret Walker poem titled "For My People." The poem describes the celebration and challenges of African-American life.

African-American art

Romare Bearden's collages and paintings portray rural African-American life. The color scheme and folk style in her work make realistic, normal every day occurrences come to life. The "Serenade" features a man playing the guitar for a woman outdoors on a sunny day. The body language of the two people gives the impression the woman is unsure of the gentleman's intentions.

Elizabeth Catlett's sculptures represent women. Mother and child are a common theme throughout her work. Bronze, onyx and stone materials detail female features. Her lithographs and paintings also portray similar images with dark, vibrant colors. One of her lithographs, "Dancing," received national exposure in The Cosby Show.

Artist Hughie Lee-Smith was an only child growing up in her family. Her early beginnings appear in her oil paintings. The imagery and symbolism focus on one person. The piece titled "The Dreamer," visualizes a girl feeling lonely in the world.

Civil rights activist, Malcolm X, appears in Edward Jackson's acrylic on canvas art piece. Malcolm X images in the past normally show his militant side. The large-scale work offers a softer, relaxed look of the historical figure.

A book about the "Something All Our Own" exhibit by Grant Hill is available in the Orlando Museum of Art gift shop for $49.99. The display runs through February 15.