Army Corps Of Engineers Levee Repair Tries To Beat Weather

The Army Corps of Engineers and its contractors are working extra hours in an effort to complete levee repairs before winter rains set in.

In Marysville a two thousand foot section of levee protecting the city from the Feather and Yuba Rivers is being reinforced with a slurry mixture of soil, cement and a special type of clay.  The underground wall will extend 120 feet into the ground.

There were delays in the project while the Corps checked to see if the mixture was done correctly. Several drilling rigs were added to the job and crews will now work 15-hour days and several Sundays to get the work done.

In South Sacramento, a concrete flood wall 10 feet high and extending seven feet beneath the ground is being built on a half mile stretch of Morrison Creek.  A Union Pacific Railroad embankment was the only thing protecting several hundred nearby homes from the flood prone creek.

"This embankment was serving as a levee but it was not designed to be a levee for issues such as seepage," said Marshall Marik, Army Corps of Engineers Project Manager.

A SMUD natural gas pipeline, a water main and fiber optic cables through the area complicated construction. Crews will now work from sunup to sundown to finish before the winter rains come. Malik says in some instances crews will work until 10 p.m.  In both cases, homeowners nearby were notified of the extend work hours.

Resident Antoine Williams says it can get noisy, but the trains that run parallel to the creek are even noisier.

"It's for our safety so we don't get flooded out so I guess it's a good thing," said Williams.

Corps officials say they are doing their best to provide flood protection for residents with the least amount of negative impact on their lives.