Paramedics load one of the track meet participants who is believed to have suffered a heat-related injury during the event.

Paramedics load one of the track meet participants who is believed to have suffered a heat-related injury during the event. (KTLA-TV)

WOODLAND HILLS -- An investigation is underway as to why a high school cross-country track meet wasn't cancelled amid dangerously hot and humid conditions.

12 girls were overcome by heat, 10 were hospitalized during a meet Thursday afternoon at Pierce College in Woodland Hills.

Now, the Los Angeles Unified School District is investigating why school officials did not cancel the race in the first place.

According to LAUSD Superintendent Ramon Cortines, school officials did not follow policy since meets are supposed to be canceled if temperatures reach 95 degrees. On Thursday, temperatures topped out at 97.

Of the ten girls who were hospitalized, two were reportedly in critical condition. Many of the participants said they were not allowed to carry water on the route.

Ambulances were called to the school after several of the teens began collapsing along the 2.9 mile race route, according to Erik Scott of the Los Angeles Fire Department.

The event started around 2:30 p.m., when it was about 97 degrees outside, coaches said.

45 firefighters were sent to the scene to treat and transport the patients around 4:30 Thursday afternoon, Scott said.

800 students participated in the event which was a high school track invitational meet sponsored by the Los Angeles Unified School District. The race covered hilly terrain and was considered a practice meet.

After ambulances and paramedic arrived to transport 10 of the 12 patients, droves of students were seen leaving the campus.

Many of the students say they weren't prepared for the race, which was the first meet of the year. Some said they didn't eat before the race. Others said they were not allowed to bring water onto the race route and would have been penalized for doing so.