Carmelo Anthony Goes to Knicks in Blockbuster Trade
Remember when Carmelo Anthony was the Denver Nuggets' problem?

Now he's the New York Knicks' problem.

In an amazing blockbuster, seeing as how the Knicks might have signed Anthony as a free agent in the summer, they traded almost everyone except Amare Stoudemire to Denver for Anthony and Chauncey Billups.

If myriad reports are confirmed, it will be a three-way deal with the Minnesota Timberwolves.

New York will get Anthony, a four-time All-Star, Billups and Denver reserves Renaldo Balkman, Anthony Carter and Shelden Williams, who were put in to make the money come out right. The Knicks also will acquire Corey Brewer from the Timberwolves.

Denver will get Knicks starters Raymond Felton, Wilson Chandler and Danilo Gallinari plus 7-foot rookie Timofey Mozgov.

Minnesota will get Knicks center Eddy Curry's expiring contract and Knicks reserve Anthony Randolph.

With Anthony rejecting contract-extension offers, the Nuggets had shopped him for months, asking the Clippers for Blake Griffin and the Chicago Bulls for Joakim Noah.

The Clippers, Bulls, et al., predictably said no.

Just as predictably, the distracted Nuggets, who were 37-19 at last season's All-Star break, fell to 32-25, No. 7 in the West.

For months, Knicks officials complained that Nuggets officials wouldn't talk to them, saying they had no one they wanted.

Unfortunately, it may have occurred to Knicks owner James Dolan:

What if we offer everyone? OK, except Amare and Landry Fields.

Convinced Anthony is the key to signing point guard Chris Paul in 2012, worried the New Jersey Nets would get him, or them, Dolan took personal control of talks here All-Star weekend.

Meeting with Anthony and Denver owner Josh Kroenke, Dolan threw two more of his starters in the deal plus the promising Mozgov.

Until that point, Knicks General Manger Donnie Walsh had offered one starter — Chandler or Gallinari — convinced he could wait and sign Anthony in the summer.

We'll never know if Anthony would have signed an extension with the Nets, having sent mixed signals — mostly no's — for months.

In a James Dolan touch, the imperious owner who got his job the old-fashioned way — from his father — turned for advice to Isiah Thomas, whom he fired two seasons ago and now coaches Florida International University.

The discovery of Thomas' involvement set off a firestorm in the New York press.