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Harvard Medical School

A collection of news and information related to Harvard Medical School published by this site and its partners.

Top Harvard Medical School Articles

Displaying items 34-44
  • Testosterone therapy carries risks but may still be reasonable

    Q: I'm a generally healthy 72-year-old man, but my energy level and sex drive are not what they were 10 years ago. How do I know if I need to take testosterone? A: Based on the ads you see on TV, you'd think the answer is straightforward. But experts are...
  • The Medicine Cabinet-Ask the Harvard Experts: Withdrawal symptoms vary among anti-anxiety drugs

    Q: I've heard that Xanax can produce more severe withdrawal symptoms than the other benzodiazepine drugs. Is this true? A: Xanax (the generic name is alprazolam) is one of the commonly prescribed anti-anxiety medicines in the class called...
  • Start slowly when launching an exercise program at 66

    Q: I'm a 66-year-old man. My doctor told me I need to exercise more to maintain good health. What's the best exercise for a man my age? How often should I do it? What symptoms should I watch out for? A: Great to hear that you're taking your doctor's...
  • EatingWell: Don't let diabetes stop you from exercising

    It's a message you hear everywhere: Exercise is one of the most important things you can do to control your diabetes. It's also a catch-22: Controlling diabetes can be so exhausting that some days just leaving the house feels like climbing a mountain....
  • Study: Emergency room closures can be deadly for area's residents

    It stands to reason that when a hospital emergency room closes, people in the surrounding neighborhood suffer. But how much? A new study quantifies the impact in California, finding that patients affected by ER closures were 5% more likely to die after...
  • Heart programs at Sentara in Norfolk retain national ranking

    Heart programs at Sentara in Norfolk retain national ranking
    Sentara Norfolk General Hospital ranked in the Top 50 programs nationwide for its Cardiology and Heart Surgery, and Ear, Nose, and Throat programs in the latest annual rankings by U.S. News & World Report. The heart programs have taken national honors for...
  • Medical sleuths seek patients with mystery diseases, offer new tools

    Medical sleuths seek patients with mystery diseases, offer new tools
    Everyone loves a medical mystery, except the afflicted patient and his or her family who shuffle from doctor to doctor in search of an explanation for a disorder whose name, origin, prognosis and cure are all unknown. Now, the National Institutes of...
  • Stop common sleep stealers before they put your health at risk

    You might remember a time when you could drift off to sleep in an instant and remain in a state of blissful slumber well past lunchtime the next day. Now your sleep is more likely to be lighter and more fitful, and when you wake up in the morning you don'...
  • The Medicine Cabinet-Ask the Harvard Experts: While vitiligo is incurable, treatment may bring back some skin color

    Q: What are the latest and best treatments for vitiligo? A: Melanin is the substance that gives color to our skin. Sometimes, melanocytes do not produce melanin. The result is vitiligo, producing white patches on different areas of the skin. The...
  • HIV establishes viral reservoirs with surprising speed

    HIV establishes viral reservoirs with surprising speed
    In a sobering discovery, researchers say that rapid treatment of HIV-like infections in monkeys failed to prevent the establishment of persistent viral reservoirs in as little as three days. The study, published Sunday in the journal Nature, comes on...
  • Pill look different? Shape and color changes may prompt lapses

    Pill look different? Shape and color changes may prompt lapses
    In a decade, Americans have saved an estimated $1.2 trillion by taking generic drugs instead of the high-priced originals. But the booming market in copycat prescription pharmaceuticals - coupled with insurance companies' efforts to keep healthcare...