RSS feeds allow Web site content to be gathered via feed reader software. Click the subscribe link to obtain the feed URL for this page. The feed will update when new content appears on this page.

Massachusetts General Hospital

A collection of news and information related to Massachusetts General Hospital published by this site and its partners.

Top Massachusetts General Hospital Articles

Displaying items 111-121
  • Expensive, newer stents not better for all patients

    Expensive, newer stents not better for all patients
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Many heart patients get newer, pricey stents inserted during artery-clearing procedures, even if it's not clear they'd be worse off with more basic models, a new study suggests. Along with being more costly, so-called drug-...
  • Patients reluctant to disagree with doctor's advice

    Patients reluctant to disagree with doctor's advice
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Although most people who participated in a new survey preferred making medical decisions together with their doctor, the majority said they wouldn't speak up if what they wanted conflicted with their physician's...
  • Hopkins falls to No. 2 on U.S. News & World Report list

    Hopkins falls to No. 2 on U.S. News & World Report list
    Johns Hopkins Hospital lost its coveted spot as the nation's top-ranked hospital for the first time in 22 years, edged out by Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital in the latest analysis by U.S. News & World Report to be released Tuesday. Hopkins still...
  • Meditation apps let the peace flow through the phone

    Meditation apps let the peace flow through the phone
    When it's time to meditate, sit comfortably, focus your attention … and reach for your smartphone? More and more people are doing just that, ifApple's iPhoneApp Store is any indication — a search for "meditation" results in more than 1,000...
  • Dr. John E. Adams

    Dr. John E. Adams
    Dr. John E. Adams, a pathologist who chaired the department of pathology at Greater Baltimore Medical Center for more than two decades after its founding and was a leading expert in bioethics, died July 9 of heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson....
  • Young doctors: fewer hours means they're less tired, less prepared

    Young doctors: fewer hours means they're less tired, less prepared
    (Reuters) - Orthopedic surgeons-in-training said they were tired less often after rules regulating how much they could work went into place, according to a U.S. survey. But the results published in the Annals of Surgery found the trainee doctors didn't...
  • One in five smokers lights up while hospitalized

    One in five smokers lights up while hospitalized
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The number of smokers lighting up on hospital grounds has fallen about seven percentage points since 1995, according to a new study. "It is encouraging that there has been improvement, but it's discouraging that the nicotine...
  • Cancer's funny?

     Cancer's funny?
    Not long after she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1994, Christine Clifford walked into her local Barnes and Noble with a simple request: "I'd like to see all of your humorous books about cancer." The clerk shot her a dirty look: "That's sick."...
  • Spinal steroid shots may have little effect on sciatica

    Spinal steroid shots may have little effect on sciatica
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Despite the growing popularity of steroid injections to treat various kinds of back pain in recent years, a new review of past research finds the shots do little to alleviate sciatica, a common condition that causes leg and...
  • Men with big beer bellies likely to have weaker bones: study

    Men with big beer bellies likely to have weaker bones: study
    CHICAGO (Reuters) - Men with excessive fat around their abdomen, commonly known as a "beer belly," are at an elevated risk for heart disease and Type 2 diabetes, and now researchers are adding osteoporosis to the list of potential hazards. More than 37...
  • Hot flashes may return after ending antidepressant

    Hot flashes may return after ending antidepressant
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - For about a third of women taking antidepressants to treat menopause symptoms, hot flashes and night sweats will return after discontinuing the drug, according to a new study. "It's important for people to understand that......