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Health Organizations

A collection of news and information related to Health Organizations published by this site and its partners.

Top Health Organizations Articles

Displaying items 56-66
  • Funding uncertain for US food safety overhaul

    Funding uncertain for US food safety overhaul
    Republican opponents of food safety legislation are already promising a fight over its funding, even before it becomes law. President Barack Obama was scheduled to sign the bill on Tuesday. It allows the Food and Drug Administration to increase...
  • Money delayed to local health organizations for HIV care

    Federal dollars that localities use to fund care for those living with HIV have been cut off for months, leaving some who can't afford their own care without services. Millions in unpaid funds are expected to begin flowing through city and state...
  • Mountain for some, molehill for others

    Mountain for some, molehill for others
    Despite several decades of urging from doctors and government officials to cut back on salt, a culprit in high blood pressure, most Americans aren't paying much attention. Americans consume, depending on which study you look at, an average of 3,000 to 4,...
  • Asthma drugs may increase attacks in kids: report

    Asthma drugs may increase attacks in kids: report
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - One class of drugs used to prevent wheezing and shortness of breath in people with asthma may increase kids' risk of being hospitalized for an asthma attack, according to a new analysis from the U.S. Food and Drug...
  • Troubled study at heart of therapy debate

    Troubled study at heart of therapy debate
    With $30 million of taxpayer money, researchers set out to conduct one of the largest studies ever of an alternative medical treatment, a controversial therapy for coronary artery disease. The project was marred with problems from beginning to end....
  • Doctors group supports fight on drug shortages

    Doctors group supports fight on drug shortages
    NEW ORLEANS (Reuters) - The American Medical Association threw its support behind government efforts to ensure the supply of lifesaving medicines but stopped short of recommending financial penalties against drug companies. The influential doctors' lobby...
  • Doctors call for preventive measures in wake of pertussis outbreaks

    Doctors call for preventive measures in wake of pertussis outbreaks
    When a series of whooping cough cases spread through a northwest suburban high school this fall, school officials knew they had to act quickly to try to stem the outbreak. Cleaning crews at Cary-Grove High School scrubbed down and repeatedly sanitized...
  • MRSA superbug much more common in U.S. than UK

    MRSA superbug much more common in U.S. than UK
    The antibiotic-mocking MRSA bacteria seem to be thriving better in the U.S. than in the U.K., according to new government data. They show that Americans are more than six times as likely as Britons to contract the superbug in the community, although...
  • Federal center pays good money for suspect medicine

    Federal center pays good money for suspect medicine
    Thanks to a $374,000 taxpayer-funded grant, we now know that inhaling lemon and lavender scents doesn't do a lot for our ability to heal a wound. With $666,000 in federal research money, scientists examined whether distant prayer could heal AIDS. It could...
  • More surgeries, costs after CT angiography: study

    More surgeries, costs after CT angiography: study
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Patients who had a CT scan to check for build-up in the arteries around the heart had more surgeries, and more costly medical care, than those who had their hearts checked with basic stress tests, in a new study. While...
  • IUDs almost halve risk of cervical cancer: study

    IUDs almost halve risk of cervical cancer: study
    LONDON (Reuters) - Contrary to popular belief, intrauterine contraceptive devices might actually protect women against developing cervical cancer even though they don't stop the infection that commonly leads to the disease, according to the results of...