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American Medical Association

A collection of news and information related to American Medical Association published by this site and its partners.

Top American Medical Association Articles

Displaying items 155-165
  • More salt in food, but should we take recommended limits with a grain of skepticism?

    More salt in food, but should we take recommended limits with a grain of skepticism?
    While many doctors urge patients to curb their sodium intake for better health, the processed food and restaurant industries continue to spike products with large amounts of sodium, according to a recent study. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans in...
  • Finding a balance with hormone replacement therapy

    Finding a balance with hormone replacement therapy
    After a decade of rancorous debate over the risks and benefits of menopausal hormone therapy, experts from more than a dozen top medical organizations worldwide have finally come to something resembling a consensus. What did they decide, and why are women...
  • USDA releases new school snack standards: Doughnuts, cookies out

    USDA releases new school snack standards: Doughnuts, cookies out
    Public schoolchildren have exactly one more school year to buy high-calorie sandwich cookies and sugary energy drinks from vending machines and snack bars at school. Beginning in the 2014-15 school year, public schools across the country will have to...
  • Parents, skip weight talk and focus on eating advice, study suggests

    Parents, skip weight talk and focus on eating advice, study suggests
    There's a growing list of things that clearly do NOT work in helping someone who's carrying too much weight trim down. Shaming, teasing and hectoring stand a good chance of backfiring, and it remains to be seen whether treating obesity as a disease --...
  • Drug may aid sleep apnea symptoms at high altitude

    Drug may aid sleep apnea symptoms at high altitude
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People with sleep apnea can safely travel to high altitudes with the help of a diuretic and a commonly used breathing device, a new study from Switzerland suggests. Researchers found acetazolamide (sold as Diamox), which is...
  • Probiotics: A gut-check on bacterial health

    Probiotics: A gut-check on bacterial health
    A fascinating, if disconcerting, fact: More than 100 trillion so-called good bacteria thrive in or on the human body. A sizable chunk of them maintain residence in the human digestive tract. Probiotics, live microorganisms that benefit their human host,...
  • Obesity declining in young, poorer kids: study

    Obesity declining in young, poorer kids: study
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The number of low-income preschoolers who qualify as obese or "extremely obese" has dropped over the last decade, new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show. Although the decline was only "modest" and...
  • What changes now that doctors have declared obesity a 'disease'?

    What changes now that doctors have declared obesity a 'disease'?
    Does it really matter if the medical establishment calls obesity a “disease” instead of a chronic health condition or a disorder? It’s a question doctors and public health experts are considering in the wake of Tuesday’s vote...
  • One in 12 in military has clogged heart arteries

    One in 12 in military has clogged heart arteries
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Just over one in 12 U.S. service members who died in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars had plaque buildup in the arteries around their hearts - an early sign of heart disease, according to a new study. None of them had been...
  • Vision loss tied to diabetes on the rise in U.S.

    Vision loss tied to diabetes on the rise in U.S.
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Vision loss likely related to diabetes increased by 20 percent over less than a decade in the U.S., according to a new study. So-called nonrefractive vision impairment - which includes glaucoma and cataracts - can't be...
  • Is Boy Scouts' ban on the severely obese severely misguided?

    This week through July 24, about 40,000 Boy Scouts and their leaders are descending on a vast encampment in the hills of southern West Virginia to engage in traditional Boy Scout pastimes — hiking, shooting, repelling, orienteering, swimming,...