topic-hedai0000026 News Coverage on Heart Disease - CTNow
RSS feeds allow Web site content to be gathered via feed reader software. Click the subscribe link to obtain the feed URL for this page. The feed will update when new content appears on this page.

Heart Disease

A collection of news and information related to Heart Disease published by this site and its partners.

Top Heart Disease Articles

Displaying items 210-220
  • Study casts doubt on some findings about sodium

    Study casts doubt on some findings about sodium
    Are Americans getting mixed messages about how much sodium they should be consuming? Lately, yes, and some of those messages are muddled because studies themselves are muddled, a panel of doctors has concluded. The Institute of Medicine panel...
  • Prescription for nutrition

    Prescription for nutrition
    Despite a growing consensus that cardiovascular disease is a "food-borne" illness, many physicians are ill-prepared to advise patients on what they should eat to best protect them from heart attack or stroke. One provocative new study found that a...
  • Aging U.S. to drive up heart-related health costs: study

    Aging U.S. to drive up heart-related health costs: study
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The costs linked to heart failure in the United States are expected to more than double within the next two decades as the population ages and treatments help patients with the disease live longer, a study released on Wednesday...
  • Fish tied to lower colon cancer risk: study

    Fish tied to lower colon cancer risk: study
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who eat plenty of fish may have a lower risk of colon and rectal cancers, a new report suggests. The finding comes from an analysis of 41 past studies on the link between fish in the diet and new diagnoses and deaths...
  • Beans show promise in diabetes

    Beans show promise in diabetes
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Downing a cup of beans or lentils every day may help people with type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar and possibly reduce their risk of heart attacks and stroke, according to a small study out today. Researchers found...
  • Exercise tied to lower risk of psoriasis: study

    Exercise tied to lower risk of psoriasis: study
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Results from a large U.S. study suggest women who regularly exercise vigorously, including runners and aerobics buffs, may be less likely to get psoriasis than less-active women. Researchers have known that people who are...
  • Obese women at increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis

    Obese women at increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis
    Obese women may have an increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis — adding one more chronic illness to the list of ills brought on by extra pounds. Women with rheumatoid arthritis are already more prone to heart attacks than the general...
  • Study suggests lower risk of death for coffee lovers

    Study suggests lower risk of death for coffee lovers
    NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In a new study of 400,000 older Americans, those who reported drinking a few daily cups of coffee were less likely to die over the next 14 years than were those who abstained from the beverage or rarely drank it. But that...
  • Healthier treats? Sweet!

    Healthier treats? Sweet!
    All snack food is not created equal. Some are sweetened with high fructose corn syrup while others use honey. Some are stuffed with white flour while others use more creative — and healthier — options. Snack and candy-makers launched their...
  • Death rate drops among Americans with diabetes — CDC

    Death rate drops among Americans with diabetes — CDC
    ATLANTA (Reuters) - A 40 percent decline in the death rate of diabetic American adults from heart disease and strokes is a sign that patients are taking better care of themselves and receiving improved treatment, according to a government study released...
  • Researchers eye saliva for patient testing

    Researchers eye saliva for patient testing
    No one likes to get stuck with a needle. But it's the only way doctors can get blood to test for diabetes, anemia and numerous other health problems. Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing say there is a much less invasive and...