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American Academy of Pediatrics

A collection of news and information related to American Academy of Pediatrics published by this site and its partners.

Top American Academy of Pediatrics Articles

Displaying items 45-55
  • Should parents spank their children?

    Should parents spank their children?
    When your 3-year-old is throwing a tantrum in the supermarket or has poured his milk all over the floor, the urge to spank may be overwhelming. If you’ve ever given in to that urge, you’re not alone; research shows that up to 90 percent of...
  • Spanking: No matter your view, there are alternatives

    Spanking: No matter your view, there are alternatives
    America is a nation intensely divided on the issue of spanking young children.  Leading child development organizations such as The America Academy of Pediatrics, the American Psychological Association and the National Association for the Education of...
  • Mental health tips for parents of teens and young adults

    Mental health tips for parents of teens and young adults
    If you are the parent of an older child or teen, you may not think about his or her day-to-day medical needs as often as you did during early childhood. But older kids also are dependent on you, especially when it comes to emotional health and wellness....
  • Tips to boost infant and toddler brain development

    Tips to boost infant and toddler brain development
    When babies are born, their minds are still a work in progress, and their brains will rapidly grow and develop based on their experience. That means the first few years are critical for healthy brain development. “Parents play a daily role in...
  • Protect your child with vaccinations

    Protect your child with vaccinations
    Vaccinations are a safe and effective way to protect your child against dangerous infectious diseases. Thanks to immunizations, polio, diphtheria and tetanus (lockjaw) have almost disappeared in the United States, and each year vaccines save an...
  • Thoughts from Dr. Joe: Statistics don't always tell a true story

    I didn't want to comment on the article appearing in the Valley Sun titled, “Mom: Teens need more sleep.” I had other fish to fry but the idea that school days should be started later to give teens more sleep rubbed me the wrong way....
  • Nickel in early iPad likely triggered allergy in boy: study

    Nickel in early iPad likely triggered allergy in boy: study
    SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Nickel in a first-generation iPad likely triggered an allergic skin reaction in an 11-year-old boy, a case that highlights an increasingly common condition linked to the rapid adoption of consumer electronics, according to a...
  • The Kid's Doctor: Swimming lessons alone will not prevent drowning

    Especially in summer, childhood drowning is an ever-present concern. Between 2000 and 2005, 6,900 U.S. children died from non-boating accidental drowning. The rate of drowning was almost four times higher for children one to two years old, and twice as...
  • When should I wean my daughter off her pacifier?

    Q: When is a child too old for a pacifier? My daughter who is 2, still uses one and cries when I take it away. If she is too old, how to I get her to stop? A: Two is not too old for a pacifier but you should be starting to think about weaning her off,...
  • Almost every junior high school kid in America watches TV every day

    Almost every junior high school kid in America watches TV every day
    Junior high students are having trouble turning away from the television. A new study from the Centers for Disease Control found that watching TV is a daily habit for close to all middle school age students in America.  It's not surprising that most...
  • Sexting in middle school linked with real-life sex, study finds

    Sexting is not a harmless activity that younger teens see as a substitute for real sex. A new study of Los Angeles middle school students finds that those who sent or received sext messages were significantly more likely than their non-sexting peers to be...