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Fertilizer

A collection of news and information related to Fertilizer published by this site and its partners.

Top Fertilizer Articles

Displaying items 89-99
  • Federal inspectors should have warned of Texas fertilizer blast

    Federal inspectors should have warned of Texas fertilizer blast
    In my reading and listening about the fertilizer plant fire and explosion in West, Texas, I have noticed a dearth of comments about the dangers faced by first responders ("Obama to honor firefighters killed in Texas fertilizer blast," April 24). One...
  • Stormwater problem is real

    Stormwater problem is real
    Many thanks go to Alison Prost of the Chesapeake Bay Foundation for her explanation of the stormwater fee ("Beyond 'rain tax' rhetoric," May 1). I would like to add a little historical background. When Europeans first visited the Chesapeake Bay, it...
  • Cause of Texas fertilizer plant blast unclear; inquiry continues

    The cause of the fire that triggered the deadly explosion of a fertilizer plant in West, Texas, last month remains undetermined after a $1-million investigation, officials said Thursday. Although the probe continues, the cause of the disaster may never be...
  • All cooped up: a guest cottage for chickens

    All cooped up: a guest cottage for chickens
    Like underfunded pensions and red-light cameras, the chicken coop is a growing trend in urban America. Chickens are a great source for fresh eggs and garden fertilizer (their nitrogen-rich waste matter is perfect for a compost heap). An urban farmer...
  • Lawn fertilizer limits take effect, but effectiveness questioned

    Lawn fertilizer limits take effect, but effectiveness questioned
    Among the hundreds of new laws taking effect Tuesday (Oct. 1) is one meant to help the Chesapeake Bay by limiting when, where and how Marylanders should feed their lawns. One scientist, though, suggests homeowners could help the bay better by forgoing...
  • West, Texas, fertilizer plant that exploded cited over safety

    WASHINGTON — Federal authorities have cited the operator of the West, Texas, fertilizer plant that exploded in April for 24 safety violations including the unsafe handling and storage of chemicals, and haveĀ  proposed $118,300 in penalties. In...
  • Rentech shifts from green energy to a more fertile field

    Rentech shifts from green energy to a more fertile field
    For most of its 33-year history, Rentech Inc. tried to make money on green fuel development. But like its plans to sell synthetic diesel to major airlines in 2009, those efforts never really left the ground. Now, the Los Angeles company is on a...
  • Bed's problem may lie in soil

    Bed's problem may lie in soil
    I have a bed by a brick wall where I plant petunias every year so they drape down. I count on them for color. This year, the petunias in the bed did well for about a month. Then suddenly they were dead. It looked like they had dried up from the root. I...
  • Nutrient pollution threatens national park ecosystems, study says

    Nutrient pollution threatens national park ecosystems, study says
    National parks from the Sierra Nevada to the Great Smoky Mountains are increasingly being fertilized by unwanted nutrients drifting through the air from agricultural operations, putting some of the country’s most treasured natural landscapes at risk...
  • Fallen leaves don't need to be in pieces to use as mulch

    Fallen leaves don't need to be in pieces to use as mulch
    Do I have to cut up fallen leaves with a mower before I use them as mulch? I don't have a mulching mower. No, you don't. In fact, many beneficial insects overwinter in leaf litter. You'll notice that no one chops up the fallen leaves in a woods, yet the...
  • Nitrate pollution continues for decades after fertilizer use

    Nitrate pollution continues for decades after fertilizer use
    Nitrates from agricultural fertilizer could continue to leach into groundwater for at least 80 years after initial use, according to researchers who conducted a long-term study of nitrogen uptake. Using isotope tracers, scientists followed the fate of...