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Norman Mailer

A collection of news and information related to Norman Mailer published by this site and its partners.

Top Norman Mailer Articles

Displaying items 45-55
  • Book Review: 'The Eyes of Willie McGee' by Alex Heard

    Book Review: 'The Eyes of Willie McGee' by Alex Heard
    The Eyes of Willie McGee A Tragedy of Race, Sex, and Secrets in the Jim Crow South Alex Heard Harper: 404 pp., $26.99 In Jim Crow's dark closet, countless skeletons lie moldering and forgotten. For every "cold case" prosecution that brings a doddering...
  • Book review: 'Missing a Beat: The Rants and Regrets of Seymour Krim' collected by Mark Cohen

    Book review: 'Missing a Beat: The Rants and Regrets of Seymour Krim' collected by Mark Cohen
    Missing a Beat The Rants and Regrets of Seymour Krim Edited and with an introduction by Mark Cohen Syracuse University Press: 296 pp., $29.95 We hear a disproportionate amount from the writers who "made it." The ones who hustled, stroked the right...
  • When it paid to photograph hard truth

    When it paid to photograph hard truth
    < The 10 photographers in "Engaged Observers," opening June 29 at the Getty Museum, are at once storytellers, witnesses, advocates for justice, investigative journalists, consciousness raisers, evidence gatherers and educators. They're also something...
  • 'The Room and the Chair' by Lorraine Adams

    'The Room and the Chair' by Lorraine Adams
    The Room and the Chair A Novel Lorraine Adams Alfred A. Knopf: 316 pp., $25.95 Lorraine Adams is a singular and important American writer. "The Room and the Chair" establishes this without question: It is remarkable for its ambitions and its...
  • 'The Suicide Run: Five Tales of the Marine Corps' by William Styron

    'The Suicide Run: Five Tales of the Marine Corps' by William Styron
    The Suicide Run Five Tales of the Marine Corps William Styron Random House: 198 pp., $24 The business -- and I use the word advisedly -- of posthumous publication is a troubling one. We honor our dear dead. Yet there are certain kinds of attention...
  • Check It Out: Celebrating holiday season with the memoir

    Merriam-Webster defines memoir as a "narrative composed from personal experience." It may encompass the entirety of a person's life, or only a portion of it. This sets it apart from a traditional autobiography, which is usually a chronological account...
  • 'Phaidon Atlas of 21st Century World Architecture' and the questionable future of monster-size books

     
    When 'The Phaidon Atlas of Contemporary World Architectureâ?? came out in 2004, it was quickly deemed a smashing success by booksellers and fans alike, despite the $160 price. The 14-pound tome was so successful, in fact, that late last year Phaidon...
  • Amazon content coup? E-tailer gets exclusive Roth, Mailer, Nabokov and Updike backlist

     
    Amazon.com now has exclusive rights to sell the e-book versions of some of the best-known titles from top literary authors Philip Roth, Norman Mailer, Vladimir Nabokov, John Updike and more. In an announcement late Wednesday -- shortly after midnight...
  • 'Mad Men': 'Gentlemen, shall we begin 1965?'

     
    As mysterious as Don Draper is, he’s also remarkably predictable. For example, I am sure I wasn't the only one who knew that Don would be paying a visit to Anna Draper the second that Harry mentioned the layover in......
  • Wylie-Amazon e-books partnership gives in to Random House

     
    Powerful agent Andrew Wylie's plan to sell the e-book backlist of some of his best-known authors -- among them John Updike, Ralph Ellison and Philip Roth -- has come mostly undone. The e-book venture, Odyssey Editions, is a partnership with......
  • Summer reading: Carolyn Kellogg on Norman Mailer

     
    Although the phrase "beach reads" evokes fluffy page turners, we had conversations around the office this spring that led us to think that people might have used the summer break-from-routine to sink into books that were meaningful, or lasting. What......