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Nobel Prize Awards

A collection of news and information related to Nobel Prize Awards published by this site and its partners.

Top Nobel Prize Awards Articles

Displaying items 144-154
  • Review: 'Roth Unbound' by Claudia Roth Pierpont

    Review: 'Roth Unbound' by Claudia Roth Pierpont
    "What is being done to silence this man?" At the risk of stealing the great first line from Claudia Roth Pierpont's immensely likable, generous and engrossing new critical biography of Philip Roth, “Roth Unbound: A Writer and His Books,”...
  • Reviews: 'Robert Oppenheimer' by Ray Monk and 'An Atomic Love Story' by Shirley Streshinsky and Patricia Klaus

    Robert Oppenheimer, the so-called father of the atomic bomb and one of the most brilliant physicists never to have won a Nobel Prize, has inspired legions of biographers and memoirists. And for good reason: He was a polymath of enormous gifts and charm....
  • USC's Nobel Prize-winning chemist credits curiosity, simplicity

    USC chemistry professor Arieh Warshel can thank curiosity and weak computers for the Nobel prize in chemistry he won Wednesday. To figure out the blazingly fast chemical ballet performed by the body’s proteins, Warshel had to form questions that...
  • Review: 'All Joy and No Fun' by Jennifer Senior

    Review: 'All Joy and No Fun' by Jennifer Senior
    I dreaded reading "All Joy and No Fun." Jennifer Senior's new book has the patina — and the subtitle, "The Paradox of Modern Parenthood" — of yet another polemic against the parenting culture as we know it. We are a nation of Tiger Moms...
  • Review: 'The Long Voyage' by Malcolm Cowley

     Review: 'The Long Voyage' by Malcolm Cowley
    Malcolm Cowley was one of the most important (and easily the most omnipresent) literary figures of the past century. Over a career that spanned eight decades (or, roughly speaking, from the Wilson to the Reagan administrations), he encouraged, befriended,...
  • New Haruki Murakami novel to be released in U.S. on Aug. 12

    New Haruki Murakami novel to be released in U.S. on Aug. 12
    Haruki Murakami’s next novel will be published in the United States on Aug. 12, A.A. Knopf announced Tuesday. “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage,” sold more than 1 million copies the first week of its release in...
  • Ronald Coase dies at 102; economist was oldest living Nobel laureate

    Ronald Coase, a British-born University of Chicago economist whose Nobel Prize-winning work on the role of corporations stemmed from visits in the early 1930s to American companies including Ford Motor Co. and Union Carbide Corp., has died. He was 102....
  • Former Magic center Marcin Gortat is thriving with the Wizards

    WASHINGTON — Former Orlando Magic center Marcin Gortat can’t wait for Wednesday night. Gortat will visit Capitol Hill to attend a special screening of a movie based on the life of Lech Walesa, the former Nobel Peace Prize winner and former...
  • John Cornforth dies at 96; Nobel Prize-winning chemist

    The difference between a glove for the left hand and one for the right is obvious to the human eye, even though the two are mirror images of each other. It is an easy task to distinguish between them and separate them from each other. Most biological...
  • David H. Hubel dies at 87; Nobel winner unlocked secrets of sight

    David H. Hubel dies at 87; Nobel winner unlocked secrets of sight
    When neurobiologist David H. Hubel accepted his Nobel Prize in 1981, it had only been a couple of decades since he and his research partner danced in front of an anesthetized cat. Hubel and Torsten N. Wiesel were measuring electrical activity in...
  • Once and for all, Rogge resists taking moral stance on Russia's anti-gay laws

    BUENOS AIRES – This was Jacques Rogge’s final press conference as head of the International Olympic Committee, an organization that fancies itself as having a global role that can reach beyond fun and games. Rogge made it very clear...