topic-peclb000000011113 News Coverage on Trine Tsouderos - CTNow
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Trine Tsouderos

Trine Tsouderos is a reporter for the Chicago Tribune.
Trine Tsouderos is a reporter for the Chicago Tribune. « Show less

Top Trine Tsouderos Articles

Displaying items 23-33
  • Letters: Many views of 'alternative' treatment

    Letters: Many views of 'alternative' treatment
    The recent series of articles by Trine Tsouderos in the Los Angeles Times misrepresents the scientific contributions and future research agenda of the National Institutes of Health and its National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine ["New...
  • Remote-control surgery grows, despite inconclusive evidence

    Remote-control surgery grows, despite inconclusive evidence
    Chubby, pink and anesthetized into unconsciousness and paralysis, 16-week-old Ian Lund was a small bump under blue drapes on an operating table at University of Chicago Medicine. Perched above him was a robot, with arms like a three-legged spider. One...
  • Vivid impressions of Russian culture in 'Encyclopedia of a Life in Russia'

    Cuban author Josť Manuel Prieto's playful and fascinating book, “Encyclopedia of a Life in Russia,” is, according to Prieto's narrator, an encyclopedia-style guide to a book the narrator is planning to write about a man named Thelonious Monk...
  • Studies cloud chronic fatigue research

    Studies cloud chronic fatigue research
    Contamination is a likely explanation for scientific data that seemed to link a retrovirus and other mouse viruses to chronic fatigue syndrome and prostate cancer, according to four papers published Monday in the journal Retrovirology. The papers provide...
  • FDA warns about treatments for autism, heart disease

    FDA warns about treatments for autism, heart disease
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration sent warning letters to seven companies and one nutritionist who sell chemicals called chelators to treat autism, cardiovascular diseases and other conditions, informing them they are violating federal law. "These...
  • Tracking hospital infections

    Ten years ago, Dr. Bob Chase would have laughed if someone had told him common infections could be eliminated in hospitals' intensive care units. "I would have said that's ridiculous, not possible," he said. "As a physician, I was trained to believe...
  • OSR#1 to Come Off Shelves

    OSR#1 to Come Off Shelves
    Pharmacies are halting sales of OSR#1, a compound marketed as a dietary supplement to parents of children with autism, six weeks after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration called the product an unapproved new drug. Several pharmacists told the Chicago...
  • Tribune watchdog update

    Tribune watchdog update
    (Click on "What we found" to read the original Tribune investigation.) Lake County's DNA doubts What we found: In December 2008, the Tribune detailed how Lake County prosecutors were pressing ahead on three cases, including one against Jerry Hobbs,...
  • Research casts doubt on theory of cause of chronic fatigue

    Research casts doubt on theory of cause of chronic fatigue
    A high-profile scientific paper that gave enormous hope to patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, and even prompted some to begin taking potent anti-HIV drugs, has been largely discredited by subsequent research. Evidence is mounting that a...
  • FDA warns doctor: Stop touting camera as disease screening tool

    FDA warns doctor: Stop touting camera as disease screening tool
    On Dr. Joseph Mercola's popular website, women are warned against getting mammograms to screen for breast cancer. Instead, the Chicago-area physician touts thermograms — digital images of skin surface temperatures — as an early detection tool...
  • Do anti-aging skin creams work?

    Do anti-aging skin creams work?
    Winter is not good to our skin. The wind chaps. The dry air wicks. The combination blows us into the arms of the billion-dollar cosmeceutical industry, which awaits with pricey over-the-counter potions and serums promising to undo the season's damage....