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Julie Deardorff

Julie Deardorff
Birthplace: Wheaton, IL
Education: University of Iowa (BA in journalism, MBA)
Childhood Influences: "Free To Be You and Me", Title IX, scoliosis, Ed Smith, my elementary school physical education instructor; Pat Johnson, my 4th grade teacher. (Where are you, Mrs. Johnson?) My olders sister, Amy, who forced me to play running bases and watch the Cubs. And, of course, my parents.
Most thrilling high school moment: Playing for Wheaton Central in the 1985 Class AA girls state basketball championship. Greatest physical challenge: Delivering a 9.2-pound baby without pain meds; two Ironman triathlons.
Pet peeve: Sitting in a car.
Words to live by: "Dieting makes you fa...
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Birthplace: Wheaton, IL
Education: University of Iowa (BA in journalism, MBA)
Childhood Influences: "Free To Be You and Me", Title IX, scoliosis, Ed Smith, my elementary school physical education instructor; Pat Johnson, my 4th grade teacher. (Where are you, Mrs. Johnson?) My olders sister, Amy, who forced me to play running bases and watch the Cubs. And, of course, my parents.
Most thrilling high school moment: Playing for Wheaton Central in the 1985 Class AA girls state basketball championship. Greatest physical challenge: Delivering a 9.2-pound baby without pain meds; two Ironman triathlons.
Pet peeve: Sitting in a car.
Words to live by: "Dieting makes you fat."
Favorite running songs: Bruce Springsteen's "This Little Light of Mine"
Recently read: "Animal, Vegetable, Miracle" By Barbara Kingsolver
Recently listened to on CD: "The Other Boleyn Girl" by Philippa Gregory
Favorite magazines include: New Scientist and The Week.
Favorite gadget: The Myself Pelvic Muscle Trainer.
Where I've traveled: Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Bolivia, Cuba, Mexico, Guatemala, Peru, Brazil, Cambodia, Viet Nam, Zambia, Tokyo, Europe and the Philippines.
Family members: Husband: Clinton, a carpenter, runner, gourmet cook, primary-care parent, and my role model for good nutrition. Sons: Luke and Erik. Cat: Zoe.
I eat: A plant-based diet. No red meat or poultry since 1985; incorporated wild salmon in 2000.
Favorite superfoods: Avocados, broccoli, blueberries, eggs, spinach, quinoa.
When no one's looking I eat: My son's leftovers.
Medical mystery I'd most like to see solved in my lifetime: Autism.
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Top Julie Deardorff Articles

Displaying items 23-33
  • Health claims: Compression socks

    Health claims: Compression socks
    Claim: Compression socks, or tight knee-high socks designed to promote circulation and fluid movement, can help athletes perform better and recover quickly. Reality: Some studies show they can improve performance, but other trials show no effect. And...
  • Abs: The problem with crunches

    Abs: The problem with crunches
    Kristine Timpert's quirky little book "If Babies Did Crunches" tries to sugarcoat an important message for adults: Beware of crunches. The not-just for-kids book stresses that if you really want to banish tummy flab or back pain, clean up your diet and...
  • Cell phones and kids: How to limit exposure

    Cell phones and kids: How to limit exposure
    If you're worried about your child's developing brain being affected by cell phones, try these tips to limit exposure: Don't let toddlers or young children use cell phones. Teenagers should limit use to head sets or texting to keep the antenna away...
  • Do kids need supplements?

    Do kids need supplements?
    When my son was 4, I tried giving him nutritional supplements to make up for his appalling diet. I mixed fish oil into his orange juice. I let him eat candylike gummy multivitamins. And I stirred a chocolate powder containing 31 fruit and vegetable...
  • The five-second rule on dropped food

    The five-second rule on dropped food
    The controversial "five-second rule" — the one that allows us to eat dropped food if it's quickly scooped off the floor — is a bunch of baloney, according to Clemson University food scientist Paul Dawson, who stirred up the long-debated...
  • Alarm fatigue a top hospital safety issue

    Alarm fatigue a top hospital safety issue
    "Alarm fatigue," or the failure of medical staff to respond to incessantly beeping devices, is one of the top conditions creating safety issues in hospitals, according to the Joint Commission, the national organization that accredits the facilities....
  • Optimism can help, hinder patients

    Optimism can help, hinder patients
    In 2004, New York's Shelley Contin-Hubbs was diagnosed with the most advanced stage of breast cancer; two different doctors told her she could have as little as six months to live. Contin-Hubbs found a third physician, one who was as optimistic and...
  • Food finesse

    Food finesse
    The way you prepare your food can be just as important as what food you eat. Is there any point in eating broccoli, for example, if you cook the life out of its natural carcinogen killers? On the other hand, some foods, such as tomatoes, may offer more...
  • What berries can do for you

    What berries can do for you
    Berries are nutritional powerhouses whether they're eaten fresh, frozen, dried, freeze-dried or powdered. But can they protect our brain and memory, melt fat and prevent urinary tract infections? Though emerging research is juicy, scientists know less...
  • Plastic: 10 things you may not know

    Plastic: 10 things you may not know
    While writing her book "Plastic: A Toxic Love Story," Susan Freinkel was shocked to learn how fast the world had become plasticized. In the 1940s, few plastics existed and hardly anything was made of it. Today, the average person is virtually never more...
  • The skinny on helping children gain weight

    The skinny on helping children gain weight
    Today's pediatricians are far busier counseling overweight children. But underweight children - often fussy eaters who have little interest in food - can be just as frustrating and worrisome. Parents think they know the solution: more food. But that's...