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Saul Bellow

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  • From the archives: Chicago is fertile soil for a fledgling writer

    From the archives: Chicago is fertile soil for a fledgling writer
    Editor's note: This week, we take a look back at a 1977 piece by Saul Bellow. The essay, which appeared about a year after he won the Nobel Prize for Literature, was excerpted from the Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities. Later this month, a new collection of Bellow's nonfiction, "There is Simply Too Much to Think About," will be published.
  • 'Book of My Lives': Aleksander Hemon's remarkable tale

    'Book of My Lives': Aleksander Hemon's remarkable tale
    Aleksandar Hemon landed in the United States two decades ago, January 1992. He was 27, a young Bosnian journalist from Sarajevo arriving on a one-month visa, arranged through a cultural exchange program sponsored by the State Department. Just after he...

    A rumination on books not yet read

    A rumination on books not yet read
    Sometimes I wonder how many books I've read in my four decades. Thousands, anyway — maybe tens of thousands — since the first one, about a choo-choo, when I was not quite 3. Right up to Anne Carson's “Autobiography of Red,”...

    The problem with David Mamet

    The problem with David Mamet
    Critic's Notebook: The dramatist who used to regularly scorch the stage with complex stories has let his anti-P.C. rage blunt his work. What in the world has happened to David Mamet? The Pulitzer Prize-winning author of "Glengarry Glen Ross," a modern...

    Paperback Writers: Sunlight and shadow in 'Los Angeles in the 1930s'

    Paperback Writers: Sunlight and shadow in  'Los Angeles in the 1930s'
    Created by FDR in 1935, in the depths of the Great Depression, the Federal Writers' Project (a small part of the wider Works Progress Administration) was a make-work agency that gave jobs to about 6,500 writers, editors and researchers before closing shop...