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Carl Sandburg

A collection of news and information related to Carl Sandburg published by this site and its partners.

Top Carl Sandburg Articles

Displaying items 56-66
  • U. of I. volunteer finds unknown Carl Sandburg poem

    With the debate over gun control heating up, a retired volunteer at a University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign made a timely find. Ernie Gullerud, a former professor of social work at the university, came upon a previously unpublished poem by Carl...
  • Rick Kogan on Carl Sandburg's 'A Revolver'

    Rick Kogan on Carl Sandburg's 'A Revolver'
    You have, no doubt, heard about the new Carl Sandburg poem. Perhaps you have read it too. It is titled "A Revolver," and it was discovered a few weeks ago by Ernie Gullerud, a former professor of social work at the University of Illinois at Urbana-...
  • Carl Sandburg athletic director dies in single-car crash

    Carl Sandburg athletic director dies in single-car crash
    Carl Sandburg High School officials are mourning the loss of the high school's athletic director who was found dead Sunday afternoon after a single-vehicle accident in Carroll County. Bruce Scheidegger, 54, had been reported missing at 11:07 p.m....
  • Schmich: Ebert reflects well on Chicago

    Schmich: Ebert reflects well on Chicago
    This column originally ran in the Chicago Tribune on Oct. 21, 2011. Some years ago when I was new to Chicago, I spotted Roger Ebert in the frozen-foods aisle of a grocery store. He was famous by then, and I did what any normal person does at the sight...
  • Kevin Coval on his new poetry collection, "Schtick"

    Kevin Coval on his new poetry collection, "Schtick"
    It must have been tempting for poet Kevin Coval to read from his own work during “Chicago Classics,” which took place one Friday night in late March in packed-with-people Preston Bradley Hall at the Chicago Cultural Center. That is because...
  • 10 things you might not know about film critics

    A screenwriter who went by the pseudonyms of R. Hyde and Reinhold Timme died recently in Chicago. Others knew the man as Roger Ebert, film critic for the Chicago Sun-Times. Ebert's death got us thinking about interesting facts involving movie critics....
  • Excerpt: 'The Third Coast' by Thomas Dyja

    Excerpt: 'The Third Coast' by Thomas Dyja
    From his stove, Nelson Algren saw a dark shape stumble out of the bar across Wabansia Avenue. It teetered once, then slumped under the Nectar Beer sign, sizzling neon in the bitter February cold. Eight degrees, an army fatigue jacket, and too many shots...
  • You (Still) Can’t Say That on TV?

     
    It should come as no surprise that as a happy proponent of vulgarity, I don’t think there’s much point in TV, radio, newspapers and other media censoring language. Let’s focus on a specific case: the word to which my parents referred...
  • Meat cutters of Kabul hack at carcasses and praise Obama

     
    The late Illinois poet Carl Sandburg once called President Obama’s town, Chicago, the “hog butcher of the world.” Here in Kabul, the former Midwest capital of slaughterhouses has a kindred spirit in Butcher Street, a small road lined...
  • Oak Forest: Where town meets country

    Oak Forest: Where town meets country
    Long walks through the winding forest preserve or the tree-lined streets near her Oak Forest home are a favorite pastime for resident Donna Bos, who also enjoys the city's easy access to transportation, nearby grocery and drug stores and "hard-working,...
  • "Alice I Have Been" by Melanie Benjamin and "The Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott" by Kelly O'Connon McNees

    "Alice I Have Been" by Melanie Benjamin and "The Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott" by Kelly O'Connon McNees
    "Alice I Have Been" by Melanie Benjamin Delacorte, 351 pages "The Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott" by Kelly O'Connor McNees Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam, 342 pages Nature may abhor a vacuum, but historical novels adore one. Even the most extensive...