topic-peclb0004562 News Coverage on Julia Keller - CTNow
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Julia Keller

Julia Keller
Julia Keller, winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing, is cultural critic at the Chicago Tribune. She joined the Tribune in late 1998.

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, W. Va. She earned a bachelor's and master's degree in English from Marshall University, and a doctoral degree, also in English, from Ohio State University. Her dissertation explored literary biography, focusing on biographies of Virginia Woolf.

She was a 1998 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. In the fall of 2006, she was McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton University. Keller also is guest essayist on the PBS program "The Newshour with Jim Lehrer."

Her book, "Mr. Gatling...
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Julia Keller, winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing, is cultural critic at the Chicago Tribune. She joined the Tribune in late 1998.

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, W. Va. She earned a bachelor's and master's degree in English from Marshall University, and a doctoral degree, also in English, from Ohio State University. Her dissertation explored literary biography, focusing on biographies of Virginia Woolf.

She was a 1998 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. In the fall of 2006, she was McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton University. Keller also is guest essayist on the PBS program "The Newshour with Jim Lehrer."

Her book, "Mr. Gatling's Terrible Marvel: The Gun That Changed Everything and the Misunderstood Genius Who Invented It," will be published by Viking in May 2008.
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Top Julia Keller Articles

Displaying items 45-55
  • They're playing our poem

    They're playing our poem
    If you want to make Stephen Sondheim mad enough to swat you over the head with a rolled-up musical score, try this: Call him a poet. As Sondheim insists in interviews, essays and in the introduction to his book "Finishing the Hat: Collected Lyrics...
  • King epic takes on time travel

    King epic takes on time travel
    In every life, a little fall must reign. One slip, one missed opportunity, one hesitation or wrong turn can haunt you forever, casting an intractable shadow over the rest of your days. The words "if only" are never far from anyone's thoughts. But what...
  • Scintillating prose — the second time around

    Scintillating prose — the second time around
    On the fifth floor of the Chicago Tribune Tower is a square windowless room accessed by a single door. This room is called, with a regrettable lack of imagination, the Book Room. It will not surprise you to learn that it is filled with books. Day...
  • Over the hill, under scrutiny

    Over the hill, under scrutiny
    A tweak. A twinge. A minor ache in the knee. A mild stitch in the side. For most of us, the process of aging arrives in what the showbiz folks call a soft open: You don't feel it in a grand thunderclap, but in a gradual series of small incidents. When...
  • Where few men dare to tread

    Where few men dare to tread
    The phenomenal and deserved worldwide success of Stieg Larsson's Millennium Trilogy -- the second book, “The Girl Who Played With Fire,” was published in the U.S. earlier this week -- has people paying close attention not only to the book's...
  • 'True Confections' spiteful, delightful

    When the time came to nail down details about the candy business for her fifth novel, "True Confections" (Shaye Areheart), Katharine Weber knew exactly where she had to go: Chicago. Each spring at McCormick Place, the National Confectioners Association...
  • What to see at Printers Row Lit Fest

    What to see at Printers Row Lit Fest
    Sunday Memoir writing: How do you turn a life story into something more than a slog through boring facts? Perhaps Carol LaChapelle has an answer. 11 a.m., University Center/Multimedia Room — Judy Hevrdejs, reporter Tavern recipes: Susan and Drew...
  • The battle over war stories: Is authenticity enough?

    The battle over war stories: Is authenticity enough?
    When Stephen Crane wrote "The Red Badge of Courage" (1895), his Civil War scenes were so sharply persuasive that the author's contemporaries assumed he was a combat veteran.He wasn't. The success of Crane's slim novel is a notable exception to the general...
  • Thoughts on J.D. Salinger

    Thoughts on J.D. Salinger
    To read "Salinger" and "91" in the same sentence is a shock, an abomination. And yet there it is, the blunt and brutal fact of it, showing up in news reports of the author's death like a rock holding down a butterfly wing: J.D. Salinger, who died...
  • A literary look back

    A literary look back
    Rick Kogan, Tribune reporter "The Last Boy: Mickey Mantle and the End of America's Childhood" By Jane Leavy Harper, $27.99 Leavy's "The Last Boy" is as masterfully researched and beautifully written as any biography this year. Sox fans like me may...
  • Whipping up White House kitchen intrigue

    Whipping up White House kitchen intrigue
    Politics is all about labels: Democrat, Republican or independent. Right, left or center. Conservative or liberal. For the characters in a Julie Hyzy novel, though, there's only one label that really matters: the one on the box, can or bottle. Because in...