RSS feeds allow Web site content to be gathered via feed reader software. Click the subscribe link to obtain the feed URL for this page. The feed will update when new content appears on this page.

Julia Keller

Julia Keller
Julia Keller, winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing, is cultural critic at the Chicago Tribune. She joined the Tribune in late 1998.

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, W. Va. She earned a bachelor's and master's degree in English from Marshall University, and a doctoral degree, also in English, from Ohio State University. Her dissertation explored literary biography, focusing on biographies of Virginia Woolf.

She was a 1998 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. In the fall of 2006, she was McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton University. Keller also is guest essayist on the PBS program "The Newshour with Jim Lehrer."

Her book, "Mr. Gatling...
Show more »
Julia Keller, winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing, is cultural critic at the Chicago Tribune. She joined the Tribune in late 1998.

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, W. Va. She earned a bachelor's and master's degree in English from Marshall University, and a doctoral degree, also in English, from Ohio State University. Her dissertation explored literary biography, focusing on biographies of Virginia Woolf.

She was a 1998 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. In the fall of 2006, she was McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton University. Keller also is guest essayist on the PBS program "The Newshour with Jim Lehrer."

Her book, "Mr. Gatling's Terrible Marvel: The Gun That Changed Everything and the Misunderstood Genius Who Invented It," will be published by Viking in May 2008.
« Show less

Top Julia Keller Articles

Displaying items 34-44
  • Are you sitting down for this?

    It was time. The chair had begun to sag in multiple places, its stamina and flexibility fatally compromised by the repeated sittings and risings, and sittings and risings, of its most frequent (and, as the French so delicately put it, "well-seated")...
  • More great literary letters

    "Letters of James Agee to Father Flye" (1962). The poet, novelist and film critic James Agee was fatherless from a young age and filled the gap with a kindly Catholic priest, to whom Agee wrote frequently and candidly. "The Letters of Virginia Woolf"...
  • Fitzgerald, in his own words

    Fitzgerald, in his own words
    Popcorn. Check. Diet Coke. Check. Twizzlers. Check. A copy of "F. Scott Fitzgerald: A Short Autobiography" (Scribner), edited by James L. West III. Check. If you're on your way to see — or see again — "Midnight in Paris," the latest film...
  • Wild Thing: Maurice Sendak made incomparable art from childhood's monsters

    Wild Thing: Maurice Sendak made incomparable art from childhood's monsters
    For every kid with a scraped knee, a skinned elbow, a bumped head and a torn shirt — the inevitable result of being very determined not to learn from one's mistakes — Maurice Sendak was your man. For every kid who builds forts out of old...
  • The long road home after 9/11

    The long road home after 9/11
    "Grief," writes Thomas Lynch, "is the tax we pay on our attachments." It is a beautiful line. It is simple and lovely and true. If you don't feel love, then you don't feel sorrow; to live without a close connection to another person is to avoid all the...
  • How flower books grow on you

    How flower books grow on you
    Two books — one old, one new — changed my mind about flowers. Before reading them, my attitude toward flowers could perhaps best be described as "indifferent." I did not hate them, but I certainly wouldn't go out of my way to include them...
  • From Walter Payton to John Matusak, the great ones return in former Chicago sportswriter's new collection

    From Walter Payton to John Matusak, the great ones return in former Chicago sportswriter's new collection
    Sportswriting is one of those professions that looks easy – all you do is watch a game and sling an opinion, right? – but is actually quite difficult precisely because of that apparent ease. Opinions are a dime a dozen. Being able to...
  • A literary look back

    A literary look back
    Rick Kogan, Tribune reporter "The Last Boy: Mickey Mantle and the End of America's Childhood" By Jane Leavy Harper, $27.99 Leavy's "The Last Boy" is as masterfully researched and beautifully written as any biography this year. Sox fans like me may...
  • Whipping up White House kitchen intrigue

    Whipping up White House kitchen intrigue
    Politics is all about labels: Democrat, Republican or independent. Right, left or center. Conservative or liberal. For the characters in a Julie Hyzy novel, though, there's only one label that really matters: the one on the box, can or bottle. Because in...
  • Interviewer's opinion: Julia Keller on Joyce Carol Oates

    Interviewer's opinion: Julia Keller on Joyce Carol Oates
    When you regard an author as the best of her generation, and among the best of any generation, and you read just about everything she's ever written - which includes, in the case of Joyce Carol Oates, dozens and dozens of novels and short-story...
  • What to see at Printers Row Lit Fest

    What to see at Printers Row Lit Fest
    Sunday Memoir writing: How do you turn a life story into something more than a slog through boring facts? Perhaps Carol LaChapelle has an answer. 11 a.m., University Center/Multimedia Room — Judy Hevrdejs, reporter Tavern recipes: Susan and Drew...