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Julia Keller

Julia Keller
Julia Keller, winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing, is cultural critic at the Chicago Tribune. She joined the Tribune in late 1998.

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, W. Va. She earned a bachelor's and master's degree in English from Marshall University, and a doctoral degree, also in English, from Ohio State University. Her dissertation explored literary biography, focusing on biographies of Virginia Woolf.

She was a 1998 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. In the fall of 2006, she was McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton University. Keller also is guest essayist on the PBS program "The Newshour with Jim Lehrer."

Her book, "Mr. Gatling...
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Julia Keller, winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing, is cultural critic at the Chicago Tribune. She joined the Tribune in late 1998.

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, W. Va. She earned a bachelor's and master's degree in English from Marshall University, and a doctoral degree, also in English, from Ohio State University. Her dissertation explored literary biography, focusing on biographies of Virginia Woolf.

She was a 1998 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. In the fall of 2006, she was McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton University. Keller also is guest essayist on the PBS program "The Newshour with Jim Lehrer."

Her book, "Mr. Gatling's Terrible Marvel: The Gun That Changed Everything and the Misunderstood Genius Who Invented It," will be published by Viking in May 2008.
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Top Julia Keller Articles

Displaying items 23-33
  • See the billionaire – then be the billionaire

    See the billionaire – then be the billionaire
    How'd they do it? That is often thought to be the primary motivation behind our fascination with the life stories of business behemoths: a curiosity about the means – both noble and scurrilous – by which mammoth fortunes are made. "Steve...
  • Bookmark: A change in chair proves challenging

    It was time. The chair had begun to sag in multiple places, its stamina and flexibility fatally compromised by the repeated sittings and risings, and sittings and risings, of its most frequent (and, as the French so delicately put it, "well-seated")...
  • Grim, gruesome — and great

    Grim, gruesome — and great
    Just how bad is this particular bad guy? You don't want to know. Or perhaps you do, which is surely the case if you appreciate the thrillers of Karin Slaughter, an absolute master at describing violence, mayhem and the darkness that stalls and sours...
  • Bookmark: A couple of seriously good reads

    Some marvelous novels vigorously refute the idea that so-called "literary fiction," the serious stuff, must be a tedious chore to read, like a bad-tasting medicine whose healing properties are somehow confirmed by the fact that you want to spit it out,...
  • Egyptian activist's memoir details the power of social media

    Egyptian activist's memoir details the power of social media
    If Paul Revere had wielded a laptop instead of a lantern — cut us some slack on the historical improbability here, OK? — he would have understood Wael Ghonim. Ghonim is the man who used social media to move his homeland of Egypt a few long...
  • Bookmark: Biopics can't match great reads about famous people

    She's got the look. She's also got the walk, the talk and the wardrobe. When Michelle Williams pouts and flounces and oozes her way across the screen in "My Week With Marilyn," giving herself unreservedly to the role of a tormented yet still-alluring...
  • Bookmark: 'Bones' an instant spiritual favorite

    Before I read "The Translation of the Bones" (Scribner) by Francesca Kay, I had three favorite novels on spiritual topics. Now I have four. Kay's fiercely lyrical yet exceedingly tough-minded novel about a tragedy precipitated by a would-be spiritual...
  • Death-defying magic of stories

    Death-defying magic of stories
    It can't have been easy. Art supplies were not exactly thick on the ground in those days — we're talking 32,000 years ago, give or take — and there were lots of other things to worry about, such as finding food, water and shelter. Not...
  • Stars, stripes and stories

    Stars, stripes and stories
    Let the fireworks begin. When talk turns to naming the Great American Novel — the upper-case designation is required by custom, if not by law — tempers tend to flare. Each time I approach the subject in a column, and display the shameless...
  • Here's the pitch from Wilfred Santiago

    Here's the pitch from Wilfred Santiago
    He was a man in motion — the beautifully controlled fury of a great athlete. How, though, to convey that energy and grit and grace on the flat page of a graphic novel? How to suggest the up-and-at-'em vigor of a Roberto Clemente in a venue that...
  • Novel puts reporter amid international skullduggery

    Novel puts reporter amid international skullduggery
    When your 5-year-old daughter wants to play "I Spy" and says, "I spy with my little eye ..." and decides that her mystery object starts with a "B," and then she points to a bar — one of the iron bars on the door of a jail cell — you know you'...