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Julia Keller

Julia Keller
Julia Keller, winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing, is cultural critic at the Chicago Tribune. She joined the Tribune in late 1998.

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, W. Va. She earned a bachelor's and master's degree in English from Marshall University, and a doctoral degree, also in English, from Ohio State University. Her dissertation explored literary biography, focusing on biographies of Virginia Woolf.

She was a 1998 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. In the fall of 2006, she was McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton University. Keller also is guest essayist on the PBS program "The Newshour with Jim Lehrer."

Her book, "Mr. Gatling...
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Julia Keller, winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing, is cultural critic at the Chicago Tribune. She joined the Tribune in late 1998.

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, W. Va. She earned a bachelor's and master's degree in English from Marshall University, and a doctoral degree, also in English, from Ohio State University. Her dissertation explored literary biography, focusing on biographies of Virginia Woolf.

She was a 1998 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. In the fall of 2006, she was McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton University. Keller also is guest essayist on the PBS program "The Newshour with Jim Lehrer."

Her book, "Mr. Gatling's Terrible Marvel: The Gun That Changed Everything and the Misunderstood Genius Who Invented It," will be published by Viking in May 2008.
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Top Julia Keller Articles

Displaying items 12-22
  • Patriot with a pen: Brad Thor's high-octane thrillers burn up the bestseller lists

    Patriot with a pen: Brad Thor's high-octane thrillers burn up the bestseller lists
    Derring-do and deadly attacks are the elements that make his books bestsellers, but there's nothing Brad Thor likes better than sitting down with a good book. The author, a Chicago native who still lives here, has simple advice for those who aspire to...
  • At summer's end, adventure

    At summer's end, adventure
    Nothing in life is certain anymore — not even death and taxes, thanks to cryonics and a Republican Congress. Thus I can't give you an absolute, ironclad, airtight guarantee that if you hold "The Magician King" (Viking) at just the right angle at...
  • The long road home after 9/11

    The long road home after 9/11
    "Grief," writes Thomas Lynch, "is the tax we pay on our attachments." It is a beautiful line. It is simple and lovely and true. If you don't feel love, then you don't feel sorrow; to live without a close connection to another person is to avoid all the...
  • Books move us — and we move books

    Books move us — and we move books
    Ideas are immortal, but the handy carrying cases in which they're toted around — i.e., books — are not. As proof, I offer my paperback edition of “Mrs. Dalloway” (1925) by Virginia Woolf. Published by Harcourt, Brace & World in...
  • How flower books grow on you

    How flower books grow on you
    Two books — one old, one new — changed my mind about flowers. Before reading them, my attitude toward flowers could perhaps best be described as "indifferent." I did not hate them, but I certainly wouldn't go out of my way to include them...
  • Bam! Pow! Crunch! Michael Chabon builds a new superhero

    Bam! Pow! Crunch! Michael Chabon builds a new superhero
    Repeat after me: Sklurp. Skreeech. Ska-runch. There. Feels good, doesn't it? Some words are just plain fun to say. And those are the words, according to Michael Chabon, that belong in any honorable, self-respecting bedtime story for children, the kind...
  • Fur sure: Northwestern alum compiles fetching essays by dog owners

    Fur sure: Northwestern alum compiles fetching essays by dog owners
    Hero. Ishmael. Ramsey. Sophie. Bonnie. Those are, in order of appearance, the names of thedogs — all mutts — with whom I have shared my life from the time I was 4 years old. And if you listen to Wade Rouse — which you most assuredly...
  • Less than meets the eye

    Less than meets the eye
    A friend of mine was fired from her first job as a TV newscaster. Her crime? She was, the news director told her with a straight face, "distractingly voluptuous." He'd considered several remedies — tying back her thick reddish-gold hair,...
  • Winter books preview: Radiant heat of words fights chill

    Winter books preview: Radiant heat of words fights chill
    Chicago will loosen winter's gloomy grip by exerting some powerful literary muscle. In the next three months, award-winning Chicago-based writers such as Don De Grazia, Nami Mun and Stuart Dybek will give readings. And don't miss a local mystery author...
  • Bookmark: Take a chance on these moguls' biographies

    How'd they do it? That is often thought to be the primary motivation behind our fascination with the life stories of business behemoths: a curiosity about the means — both noble and scurrilous — by which mammoth fortunes are made. "Steve...
  • Celebrating 12 in 2012

    In an anecdote that sticks to the memory like an overdone cookie on an undergreased cookie sheet — those 2011 holiday baking mishaps still rankle — an American visiting the Sorbonne is accosted by a French student. "You Americans!" the...