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Julia Keller

Julia Keller
Julia Keller, winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing, is cultural critic at the Chicago Tribune. She joined the Tribune in late 1998.

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, W. Va. She earned a bachelor's and master's degree in English from Marshall University, and a doctoral degree, also in English, from Ohio State University. Her dissertation explored literary biography, focusing on biographies of Virginia Woolf.

She was a 1998 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. In the fall of 2006, she was McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton University. Keller also is guest essayist on the PBS program "The Newshour with Jim Lehrer."

Her book, "Mr. Gatling...
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Julia Keller, winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for feature writing, is cultural critic at the Chicago Tribune. She joined the Tribune in late 1998.

Keller was born and raised in Huntington, W. Va. She earned a bachelor's and master's degree in English from Marshall University, and a doctoral degree, also in English, from Ohio State University. Her dissertation explored literary biography, focusing on biographies of Virginia Woolf.

She was a 1998 Nieman Fellow at Harvard University. In the fall of 2006, she was McGraw Professor of Writing at Princeton University. Keller also is guest essayist on the PBS program "The Newshour with Jim Lehrer."

Her book, "Mr. Gatling's Terrible Marvel: The Gun That Changed Everything and the Misunderstood Genius Who Invented It," will be published by Viking in May 2008.
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Top Julia Keller Articles see all

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  • Wild Thing: Maurice Sendak made incomparable art from childhood's monsters

    Wild Thing: Maurice Sendak made incomparable art from childhood's monsters
    For every kid with a scraped knee, a skinned elbow, a bumped head and a torn shirt — the inevitable result of being very determined not to learn from one's mistakes — Maurice Sendak was your man.
  • The long road home after 9/11

    The long road home after 9/11
    "Grief," writes Thomas Lynch, "is the tax we pay on our attachments." It is a beautiful line. It is simple and lovely and true. If you don't feel love, then you don't feel sorrow; to live without a close connection to another person is to avoid all the...

    How flower books grow on you

    How flower books grow on you
    Two books — one old, one new — changed my mind about flowers. Before reading them, my attitude toward flowers could perhaps best be described as "indifferent." I did not hate them, but I certainly wouldn't go out of my way to include them...

    From Walter Payton to John Matusak, the great ones return in former Chicago sportswriter's new collection

    From Walter Payton to John Matusak, the great ones return in former Chicago sportswriter's new collection
    Sportswriting is one of those professions that looks easy – all you do is watch a game and sling an opinion, right? – but is actually quite difficult precisely because of that apparent ease. Opinions are a dime a dozen. Being able to...

    What if dad thinks he's Dostoevski?

    Some people dream of smacking the game-winning grand slam in the bottom of the ninth, or curing cancer, or being elected president, or running into a burning building to rescue babies and/or kittens. And some people dream of sitting down at a desk to...