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Jon Hilkevitch

Jon Hilkevitch
Jon Hilkevitch has been the Chicago Tribune's transportation reporter since 1997. He is responsible for covering every mode of transportation, both locally and nationally, although his primary focus is transportation news affecting the Chicago metropolitan region.

One day he might write a story about an expressway project, the next day about an airplane accident, the problem of Chicago Transit Authority buses bunching up on downtown Chicago's congested streets or the prospect of privatizing the Illinois Tollway.

The common thread in his reporting is a strong consumer-oriented focus, whether the issue is flight delays at O'Hare International Airport or railroad grade-crossin...
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Jon Hilkevitch has been the Chicago Tribune's transportation reporter since 1997. He is responsible for covering every mode of transportation, both locally and nationally, although his primary focus is transportation news affecting the Chicago metropolitan region.

One day he might write a story about an expressway project, the next day about an airplane accident, the problem of Chicago Transit Authority buses bunching up on downtown Chicago's congested streets or the prospect of privatizing the Illinois Tollway.

The common thread in his reporting is a strong consumer-oriented focus, whether the issue is flight delays at O'Hare International Airport or railroad grade-crossing safety.

In 2001, a team of Tribune reporters co-led by Hilkevitch was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for explanatory journalism for their series "Gateway to Gridlock,'' which chronicled the capacity crisis confronting the airline industry and the nation's commercial airports.

Hilkevitch, 52, also writes a weekly commuting column, called Getting Around, which allows him to interact more informally with readers and to bring their complaints about problems on Chicago-area roads and mass transit to the attention of the appropriate government agencies and, when necessary, to relentlessly prod those agencies until they do the right thing.

Hilkevitch lives in Lisle and commutes to work using Metra, the CTA and his own two feet.

His son, Nicholas, is an FAA-certified commercial pilot. He is completing his senior year at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb and plans to pursue a career in aviation.
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Top Jon Hilkevitch Articles

Displaying items 12-22
  • Emanuel puts Claypool behind wheel of CTA

    Emanuel puts Claypool behind wheel of CTA
    Mayor-elect Rahm Emanuel may have picked an outsider to run Chicago Public Schools, but he stuck with City Hall insiders to ensure the city's trains and buses run on time. New CTA President Forrest Claypool, who has known Emanuel for decades, will...
  • Lake Shore Drive to include emergency escape route

    Lake Shore Drive to include emergency escape route
    Median roadway construction designed to create an escape route for drivers potentially stranded on North Lake Shore Drive will begin Monday, according to the Chicago Department of Transportation. Median roadway construction designed to create an escape...
  • Chicago's transportation infrastructure weakening

    Chicago's transportation infrastructure weakening
    Wacker Drive near Lake Street in downtown Chicago offers a panorama of an incredible transportation metropolis that huge numbers of people rely upon every day, yet often take for granted. Cars, buses, trucks, taxis, bicyclists and pedestrians use both...
  • Most Chicago parking-meter tickets that are contested get tossed

    Most Chicago parking-meter tickets that are contested get tossed
    The city has put its parking ticket crews in overdrive, issuing citations at a faster clip than last year, but a Tribune analysis of court records shows that the vast majority of tickets contested by motorists are thrown out. In response to a Freedom...
  • Chicago transit security beefed up

    Commuters in Chicago and around the country can expect to ride to work with police and bomb-sniffing dogs Friday as transit systems bulk up security following terror bombings in London. Within hours of Thursday's rush-hour attacks on British subway...
  • CTA derailment blamed on driver

    CTA derailment blamed on driver
    A veteran CTA train motorman apparently disobeyed a red "stop" signal and overruled equipment that triggered the emergency brakes, resulting in a derailment Wednesday high above the ground, according to a preliminary investigation by transit officials....
  • Daley hoping to land funds for O'Hare

    WASHINGTON — Mayor Richard Daley met with lawmakers Tuesday to push for Chicago's share of a federal stimulus package, including $50 million he said would be crucial to keeping the expansion of O'Hare International Airport on track. Without that...
  • Storm moves on; outages, flight delays, clogged interstate remain

    4:39 PM: The good news: The storm has moved out of the Chicago region, headed east. The bad news: Local temperatures are about to plunge. "Tonight, with clearing skies and snow pack, temperatures are going to drop pretty fast," said Tim Halbach,...
  • Absent CTA workers force riders to wait

    Absent CTA workers force riders to wait
    The odds of experiencing a bad commute on the CTA are greater on Mondays and Fridays and during the run-up to rush periods, all because of canceled buses and trains, a Tribune examination of performance data has found. The worst month for canceled runs...
  • 1 remote parking lot to remain closed

    Already faced with longer lines at airline check-in counters and security checkpoints, travelers to O'Hare International Airport have also been dealing with confusing and more expensive parking arrangements. City aviation officials said the 3,118-space...
  • Aviation security hassles, weaknesses persist

    Aviation security hassles, weaknesses persist
    Major vulnerabilities persist in the decade since air travelers sacrificed convenience and privacy for the promise of heightened security in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks, and the message from the government and security watchdogs is that there still ...