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Harriet Beecher Stowe

Harriet Beecher Stowe was a woman ahead of her times. Best known as the author of the best-seller ┐Uncle Tom┐s Cabin,┐ Stowe wrote more than 30 books over 50 years while raising seven children and running a household. Stowe was born in 1811 in Litchfield, Conn., to a preacher who spoke out against the practice of slavery long before it was fashionable. Stowe's book ┐Uncle Tom┐s Cabin┐ is credited with popularizing the abolitionist cause against slavery and is said to have contributed to the outbreak of the Civil War between the Northern United State and south. Legend has it that when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln met Harriet Beecher Stowe in 1862 he said, "So you're the little woman who w... Show more »
Harriet Beecher Stowe was a woman ahead of her times. Best known as the author of the best-seller ┐Uncle Tom┐s Cabin,┐ Stowe wrote more than 30 books over 50 years while raising seven children and running a household. Stowe was born in 1811 in Litchfield, Conn., to a preacher who spoke out against the practice of slavery long before it was fashionable. Stowe's book ┐Uncle Tom┐s Cabin┐ is credited with popularizing the abolitionist cause against slavery and is said to have contributed to the outbreak of the Civil War between the Northern United State and south. Legend has it that when U.S. President Abraham Lincoln met Harriet Beecher Stowe in 1862 he said, "So you're the little woman who wrote the book that started this Great War!" After Stowe┐s scholarly husband retired, the family moved to Hartford, where she built her dream house. n 1873, she moved to her last home, the brick Victorian Gothic cottage-style house on Forest Street, which is open as a museum. The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center in Hartford, adjacent to the Mark Twain House and Museum, has three historic buildings on 2.5 acres. « Show less

Top Harriet Beecher Stowe Articles

Displaying items 23-33
  • Underrated destinations recommended by Times readers

    Nature in the Eastern Sierra Nevadas. Art in a deep Polish salt mine. A friendly Wisconsin town. A hike with views of the Tasmanian coast. Readers have spanned the globe and discovered adventure, history and in many places, peace. Here are some of their...
  • On the trail of 'Ramona' in California

    Reporting from Ventura, Riverside, and San Diego Counties -- Why, you may ask, are we rushing north on Interstate 5 and veering east on California 126 into the Santa Clara Valley? Why are we pulling off the road by a fruit stand and slipping into the...
  • Historical novel looks at a divided Beecher family

    HARRIET AND ISABELLA By Patricia O'Brien Touchstone, 320 pages, $25 Imagine, for a moment, a family that so enthralls the country that its members' every move is chronicled by the media. Think reformist Kennedys, stalwart Bushes and add authors of...
  • Fantasy Xmas shopping for book lovers: Christie's droolworthy auction

     
    Looking for just the right gifts for the book lovers in your life? Today, in two auctions, Christie's is auctioning some rare and stunning literary artifacts. Cormac McCarthy's typewriter is only the beginning; there are first editions and letters and.......
  • Cormac McCarthy's $254,500 typewriter

     
    Cormac McCarthy's typewriter sold at auction today for 254,500 bones, more than 12 times the estimated cost of $15,000-$20,000. And the thing barely works! Functionality isn't the point, of course: Provenance is. It's notable that McCarthy has written all...
  • Art review: Glenn Ligon at Regen Projects

     
    "Rage can only with difficulty, and never entirely, be brought under the domination of the intelligence," the great American writer James Baldwin observed in 1953, "and is therefore not susceptible to any arguments whatever." An African American living in...
  • Deathbed 'Visions, Trips, and Crowded Rooms'

    Deathbed 'Visions, Trips, and Crowded Rooms'
    The first thing required when reading "Visions, Trips, and Crowded Rooms" by the renowned thanatologist David Kessler is the suspension of skepticism. His book is about "the other side" — as in experiences in which the dying claim to achieve...
  • Hartford

    Hartford
    ORIGINS: Settled in 1633 as a Dutch trading post called House of Hope. Founded in 1635 by a group of settlers from Massachusetts led by the Rev. Thomas Hooker. NAME: Originally called Newtown, it was named Hartford in 1637 after Hertford, England. DID...
  • Tiger Woods Target Of 'South Park' Season Premiere

    Tiger Woods Target Of 'South Park' Season Premiere
    It's tough to come up with a suitable cartoon to accompany a new season of "South Park" ( Comedy Central, 10 p.m.), which begins its new season addressing the Tiger Woods incident. But the latest stab at an adjoining cartoon, "Ugly Americans" (Comedy...
  • Closeup On Litchfield

    HOW IT GOT ITS NAME: From Lichfield in Staffordshire, England. Local historians have concluded that the added "T" was the result of a clerical error. ORIGINS: Originally called Bantam by the Indians, the area was settled in 1719 when a group from...
  • Puritans Viewed Christmas As Corrupt Religious Ritual

    The Grinch would have come up empty- handed in Colonial Connecticut. There would have been no presents under the tree, let alone a tree to steal. Christmas was viewed by the Puritans of New England as a corrupt religious, if not a pagan, ritual and was...