RSS feeds allow Web site content to be gathered via feed reader software. Click the subscribe link to obtain the feed URL for this page. The feed will update when new content appears on this page.

Mystery (genre)

A collection of news and information related to Mystery (genre) published by this site and its partners.

Top Mystery (genre) Articles

Displaying items 45-55
  • Tough guys, unite

    Tough guys, unite
    Cornell Woolrich (1903-1968) knew his way around two things: rock-hard prose and stone-cold corpses. He was a wizardly writer of mysteries, a man who could ratchet up the menace and dread by steady, excruciating degrees. His sentences were of the...
  • Sherlock Holmes in a skirt

    Sherlock Holmes in a skirt
    When Tasha Alexander strolls the streets of Chicago, she doesn't much see Wrigley Field or the Chicago River or Logan Square. Or Honda Civics. She sees St. Paul's Cathedral and the River Thames and Belgrave Square and hansom cabs. Alexander's...
  • 'The Plot Against Hip Hop: A Novel' by Nelson George

    'The Plot Against Hip Hop: A Novel' by Nelson George
    Music critic and author Dwayne Robinson, a middle-aged black man, has been murdered with a box cutter, and his friend, D, wants to know whodunit. When Dwayne shows up at the front door of D Security, D's office, wearing a bloody beige trench coat and a...
  • Tea Obreht can write

    Tea Obreht  can write
    Here's what I like about Tea Obreht's debut novel, "The Tiger's Wife": Obreht can write. She can put a sentence together, inhabit characters with lives far different than hers; she can trace the horrors of a war she's never seen. All that is essential,...
  • Review: "The Troubled Man: A Kurt Wallander Novel" by Henning Mankell

    Review: "The Troubled Man: A Kurt Wallander Novel" by Henning Mankell
    Mother of Mercy, is this the end of Kurt Wallander? Don't worry, the peerless Swedish police detective, the pride of the force in rural Ystad, doesn't get ruthlessly gunned down like Edward G. Robinson's Rico Bandello in "Little Caesar." It's that author...
  • For Grimes, love of stories no mystery

    For Grimes, love of stories no mystery
    If she weren't writing mysteries, Martha Grimes says, she might be running a tea shop. You were expecting perhaps an auto-parts store? No, you weren't. Not if you know Grimes' work, which includes 22 mysteries featuring the incisive Scotland Yard...
  • Video/Q&A: 'Project X' stars Thomas Mann, Jonathan Daniel Brown and Oliver Cooper

    Video/Q&A: 'Project X' stars Thomas Mann, Jonathan Daniel Brown and Oliver Cooper
    “Project X” puts you right in the center of the action—in this case, what may be the biggest onscreen party of all time. Or to put it another way, says “Project X” co-star Jonathan Daniel Brown, the movie has an “anti-...
  • Joe Gores dies at 79; prize-winning mystery writer

    Joe Gores dies at 79; prize-winning mystery writer
    Joe Gores, a former San Francisco private investigator who became a prize-winning author of hardboiled mysteries such as "Hammett," "Come Morning" and "Spade & Archer," has died. He was 79. A resident of San Anselmo, Calif., Gores died of a stomach...
  • Not Just for Kids: 'The Mostly True Story of Jack'

    Not Just for Kids: 'The Mostly True Story of Jack'
    The Mostly True Story of Jack A Novel Kelly Barnhill Little, Brown: 323 pp., $16.99, ages 8 and up Fantastical middle-grade mysteries have long been populated with protagonists confronted with evildoing and tasked with righting wrongs. A negligent...
  • Dinosaur Hall holds something big

    Dinosaur Hall holds something big
    There is nothing juvenile about the three Tyrannosaurus rex skeletons at the heart of the Natural History Museum's new Dinosaur Hall, crouching with their great heads and menacing teeth hovering just above an unlucky duck-billed Edmontosaurus skeleton &#...
  • The Siren's Call: The past is never past

    The Siren's Call: The past is never past
    "The past is never dead," Faulkner famously wrote in "Requiem for a Nun." "It's not even past" — and nothing demonstrates that maxim better than the discovery of a "new" painting by a revered, long-dead artist. Suddenly, it is as if that person...