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Archaeology

A collection of news and information related to Archaeology published by this site and its partners.

Top Archaeology Articles

Displaying items 89-99
  • New UMBC arts center is built for show

    New UMBC arts center is built for show
    The just-completed Performing Arts and Humanities Building atop the campus of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, makes quite a statement from almost every angle — the sun-reflecting, stainless-steel-wrapped Concert Hall; the glass-...
  • Moravian Historical Society searches beneath the surface

    Moravian Historical Society searches beneath the surface
    On the outskirts of Nazareth's downtown, buried beneath the stately grounds of the Whitefield House, lies an untold story of the Moravian settlers who came here in 1740. It's not about the beautiful brass and woodwind music of their church services,...
  • New Colonial Williamsburg lab unravels secrets of the 1700s

     New Colonial Williamsburg lab unravels secrets of the 1700s
    WILLIAMSBURG — No one who works for Colonial Williamsburg's vast and perpetually busy collections department signs up for the job because they think it will be easy. Starting with nearly 70,000 examples of American and British fine, decorative and...
  • Wren dig reveals lost colonial building

    Wren dig reveals lost colonial building
    WILLIAMSBURG — Even in a town that archaeologists have probed countless times since 1930, few places have been dug over as many times as the landmark compound that makes up the historic colonial campus at the College of William and Mary. But...
  • The 'Archaeology' of Sally Kirkland

    "MY ATTITUDE is always one of sensuality and aggressive enthusiasm and a kind of outrageousness of expression. I suppose if I'd wanted to be the girl next door, I could have been. I think America is confused by someone who appears sensual and spiritual at...
  • Toothless 'dragon' pterosaurs once ruled skies worldwide, study says

    Toothless 'dragon' pterosaurs once ruled skies worldwide, study says
    Ancient winged reptiles called pterosaurs were so successful that they ruled Earth's skies for tens of millions of years, according to a study published in the journal ZooKeys. The fearsome fliers, part of a family of pterosaurs named Azhdarchidae,...
  • Cave art 'hashtag' is first by Neanderthals, researchers say

    Cave art 'hashtag' is first by Neanderthals, researchers say
    Belying their reputation as the dumb cousins of early modern humans, Neanderthals created cave art, an activity regarded as a major cognitive step in the evolution of humankind, scientists reported Monday in a paper describing the first discovery of...
  • READER SUBMITTED: The New England Vampire Folk Belief: The Archeological Evidence

    The Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum will add to October's chill with a timely discussion of a real "skull-and-crossbones" scenario and an historical belief in vampires, right here in Connecticut. On Oct. 16 state archaeologist Dr. Nicholas Bellantoni will...
  • Cahokia Mounds: An early urban America

    Cahokia Mounds: An early urban America
    As dawn arrives on Dec. 21 at Cahokia Mounds, the sun will rise directly behind a pole hand-hewn from red cedar. Forty-eight such posts form a large circle, but only one of them will align with the sun. Winter will begin. Four times a year, people...
  • Ancient shellfish suggest modern humans evolved 50,000 years ago

    Ancient shellfish suggest modern humans evolved 50,000 years ago
    The development of art, culture, and advanced cognitive ability that define modern humans may not have evolved until 50,000 years ago, according to a new study published online Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Richard Klein...
  • Unearthing a secret from the War of 1812

    Unearthing a secret from the War of 1812
    Williamsburg archaeologist Alain Outlaw knew he wouldn't have much time to dig when he won the chance to probe for a lost piece of historic Fort Norfolk in 2004. He had only two weeks at first to carry out what looked like an impossible rescue job....