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Archaeology

A collection of news and information related to Archaeology published by this site and its partners.

Top Archaeology Articles

Displaying items 67-77
  • Archaeologists unearth lost landscape of Colonial Williamsburg

    Archaeologists unearth lost landscape of Colonial Williamsburg
    President Franklin Roosevelt wasn’t the only one impressed by Duke of Gloucester Street when he dedicated Colonial Williamsburg’s newly reconstructed 18th-century thoroughfare in 1934. Laid out according to a plan drawn by Gov. Francis...
  • Archaeologists hosting open house at Patterson Park dig

    Archaeologists hosting open house at Patterson Park dig
    Archaeologists conducting a dig in Patterson Park are holding an open house Saturday to share discoveries with the community. The project, organized by nonprofit Baltimore Heritage, is exploring an area in the northwest corner of the park, near the...
  • Navy faces daunting task of counting desert petroglyphs

    Navy faces daunting task of counting desert petroglyphs
    Archaeologists know it as Renegade Canyon, a lava gorge in desert badlands with more than 1 million images of hunters, spirits and bighorn sheep etched in sharp relief on cliff faces and boulders. But this desert is in the heart of the China Lake...
  • Rewriting history at James Fort

     Rewriting history at James Fort
    Since pushing their first shovel into the ground 20 years ago, Jamestown archaeologists have rewritten the history of America's first permanent English settlement numerous times, beginning with the 1996 discovery of the landmark fort that most people...
  • Archaeologists open new trench in search for Hampton's landmark Civil War refugee slave village

    Archaeologists open new trench in search for Hampton's landmark Civil War refugee slave village
    Archaeologists searching for evidence of a landmark Civil War refugee slave camp opened up a new trench this week, hoping to add to the unexpectedly rich catalog of nearly 200 features that have been unearthed since the downtown dig began almost a month...
  • New finds suggest Civil War camp survives

    New finds suggest Civil War camp survives
    HAMPTON — Archaeologists searching for evidence of a landmark Civil War refugee slave camp opened up a new trench last week, adding to the unexpectedly rich catalog of nearly 200 features that have been unearthed since the downtown dig began...
  • Focus turns to preserving history unearthed in Patterson Park dig

    Focus turns to preserving history unearthed in Patterson Park dig
    Now that signs of the history of Hampstead Hill have been unearthed, historians hope to keep its 200-year-old stories from being forgotten again soon. Advocates for Patterson Park and Baltimore's legacy of the War of 1812 plan new signs and displays for...
  • Donated artifacts put focus on Orland Park's history

    Donated artifacts put focus on Orland Park's history
    Orland Park received an unusual donation in April: a collection of Native American artifacts, including arrowheads and knives more than 1,000 years old, all found within the village. Lester Marszalek, president of Greater Oak Lawn Diggers and an...
  • The original 'American Picker'

    The original 'American Picker'
    Though some people think of pickers as mere dumpster divers, Mike Wolfe doesn't mind. His childhood hobby spawned an adult obsession, one that he has parlayed into a popular antiques business and an even more popular TV show. Millions of viewers tune in...
  • Richard Daugherty dies at 91; archaeologist studied Makah tribe site

    Tidal erosion caused by a February 1970 winter storm ate away a bank of soil on Washington's Olympic Peninsula, revealing parts of five Native American longhouses. The longhouses near Lake Ozette had been buried suddenly by a mudslide sometime around...
  • Ancient toddler whose DNA helped science will now be reburied

    Ancient toddler whose DNA helped science will now be reburied
    The skeletal remains of an infant who lived in what is now Montana about 12,600 years ago will be reburied in a formal ceremony now that scientists have sequenced its genome, researchers say. The fragments of the young boy's skeleton are the sole...