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Archaeology

A collection of news and information related to Archaeology published by this site and its partners.

Top Archaeology Articles

Displaying items 45-55
  • Baltimore's Revolutionary jewel [Commentary]

    Baltimore's Revolutionary jewel [Commentary]
    Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is right. We will not succeed in growing Baltimore's future by "thinking small" but by building "projects that will sustain Baltimore well into the future" ("Moving Baltimore Forward," Aug. 29). The mayor proposes that...
  • Cave art 'hashtag' is first by Neanderthals, researchers say

    Cave art 'hashtag' is first by Neanderthals, researchers say
    Belying their reputation as the dumb cousins of early modern humans, Neanderthals created cave art, an activity regarded as a major cognitive step in the evolution of humankind, scientists reported Monday in a paper describing the first discovery of...
  • READER SUBMITTED: The New England Vampire Folk Belief: The Archeological Evidence

    The Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum will add to October's chill with a timely discussion of a real "skull-and-crossbones" scenario and an historical belief in vampires, right here in Connecticut. On Oct. 16 state archaeologist Dr. Nicholas Bellantoni will...
  • New UMBC arts center is built for show

    New UMBC arts center is built for show
    The just-completed Performing Arts and Humanities Building atop the campus of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, makes quite a statement from almost every angle — the sun-reflecting, stainless-steel-wrapped Concert Hall; the glass-...
  • Moravian Historical Society searches beneath the surface

    Moravian Historical Society searches beneath the surface
    On the outskirts of Nazareth's downtown, buried beneath the stately grounds of the Whitefield House, lies an untold story of the Moravian settlers who came here in 1740. It's not about the beautiful brass and woodwind music of their church services,...
  • Remains of Oak Brook settlers being moved

    Remains of Oak Brook settlers being moved
    Thirteen years ago a human skull tumbled out of a load of dirt during a road-widening project in Oak Brook. That gruesome discovery signaled the start of an odyssey that is finally culminating with the excavation and relocation of the graves of more...
  • Solving mystery of 'Lost City' in Everglades

    Solving mystery of 'Lost City' in Everglades
    Deep in the Everglades is Lost City, a place where mobster Al Capone reportedly produced moonshine to keep a nearby saloon jumping in the 1930s. Before that, during the Civil War, about 30 to 40 Confederate soldiers hid out there until they were...
  • Roman aqueduct volunteers tap into history beneath their feet

    Roman aqueduct volunteers tap into history beneath their feet
    ROME — In a verdant valley east of Rome, Fabrizio Baldi admires a forgotten stretch of a two-tier Roman aqueduct, a stunning example of the emperor Hadrian's 2nd century drive to divert water from rural springs to his ever-thirstier capital. But...
  • Neanderthals: Smarter than we thought?

    They've been portrayed as the original nitwits -- stone-age oafs whose limited mental capacity fated them to extinction as wily Homo sapiens entered Europe and out-competed them for precious resources. But could it be that our robust cousins the...
  • Archaeologists hosting open house at Patterson Park dig

    Archaeologists hosting open house at Patterson Park dig
    Archaeologists conducting a dig in Patterson Park are holding an open house Saturday to share discoveries with the community. The project, organized by nonprofit Baltimore Heritage, is exploring an area in the northwest corner of the park, near the...
  • Patterson Park dig uncovering traces of War of 1812 militia camp, defenses

    Patterson Park dig uncovering traces of War of 1812 militia camp, defenses
    When Samuel Smith, major general of the Maryland militia, needed a headquarters to plot Baltimore's defense from British invaders in the summer of 1814, archaeologists believe he called on the owner of a shop that gives Butcher's Hill its name. Jacob...