For the average person spending time in Hawaii, a typical schedule might include a relaxing swim in the island waters or perhaps a run on the beach — maybe even a bike ride through the scenery.

Alyssa Godesky isn't average.

She participated Saturday in the 34th Ironman World Championships in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. The race includes a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride, capped off with a 26.2-mile run.

The Baltimore native came in 969th place in her age group (25th in her division) with a time of 11 hours, 6 minutes, 8 seconds. She finished the swim in 1:08:37, the bike ride in 5:48:05 and the run in 4:02:45.

Yet her participation in her first world championship is not the peak. Rather, it is one of the steppingstones she has worked toward over the past three years to achieving a bigger goal: becoming a professional triathlete.

"I feel like I'm so close," Godesky said. "I want to show myself that I can compete at that level."

Three years ago the Archbishop Spalding graduate, who started out running ultramarathons, began experimenting with triathlons and Ironman races, entering two in 2009 and two more in 2010. But she quickly realized she could not do it alone. She was going to need a coach — one like Hillary Biscay.

Biscay is one of the top professional triathletes in the country, having competed in more than 50 Ironman competitions and setting records along the way. Outside of competing, Biscay also offers coaching to a "select group" of athletes.

The fact that Godesky, 27, was inexperienced in the triathlon circuit did not factor into Biscay's decision to take her on as an athlete in the fall of 2010.

"It didn't really matter her talent level; I knew she had the mental fortitude," Biscay said. "When I saw [Alyssa's] resume, I thought, 'Yep, sign me up for this job.'"

Godesky, who lives in Baltimore, and the Tucson, Ariz.-based Biscay have been in constant contact via texts, phone calls and email over the past two years. Biscay sends workouts and Godesky posts her results to be critiqued.

"She's highly coachable," said Biscay, who has competed five times in Hawaii. "More so than any of my other athletes."

Armed with a coach, Godesky improved greatly, leading to a series of breakthroughs, including her qualification for Saturday's world championships.

After a disappointing finish at the Ironman in Louisville, Ky., in August 2011 — she finished 17th in her age group after a bad marathon leg — Godesky found herself in sixth heading into the final leg at the Ironman in Arizona with a qualifying spot on the line.

"I had the run of my life," Godesky said. "I slowly started chipping away and it was one of those magical moments when everything comes together."

Her run earned her a second-place finish and a spot in Hawaii — just another step toward her future. Biscay and Godesky have laid out a long-term plan for her to turn professional in 2014.

Technically, Godesky could make the jump to the professional or an "elite" rank now based on her number of podium finishes. But the pair decided it was best to wait a little longer before taking the next step.

"Looking at the progress I have made in the last 18 months, jumping into it now is not necessarily something her or I am looking to do," Godesky said. "I have definitely learned that having patience in this sport is a huge asset, so taking another year to work on my weaknesses and get used to racing more and just preparing myself better to race as a professional is the way we decided to go."

Godesky's training has had its high and lows, including the stress of balancing rigorous workouts with a full-time job. She was hit by a car in July while training on her bike for Hawaii, suffering minor injuries.

Nevertheless, she has overcome setbacks and her professional prospects look promising to those around her.