Environmental efforts

Dr. Pat Gleason, left, former governing board member of South Florida Water Management District, gets a closer look at moths which were lingering around after about 400 were released by Bob Pemberton, the lead scientist at the United States Department of Agriculture's agricultural research service's invasive plant research lab, Darrell Cole, South Atlantic Area Director of the U.S.D.A.'s agricultural research service, and U.S. Representative E. Clay Shaw, Jr. at a Lygodium-eating moth release ceremony at Jonathan Dickinson State Park in Hobe Sound. The army of leaf-eating moths were released after years of research, a team lead by Pemberton, that found that the insects eat Lygodium, a climbing fern that is spreading quickly through Florida's natural area, threatening Everglades restoration efforts.

( Sun Sentinel / File / February 14, 2005 )

Dr. Pat Gleason, left, former governing board member of South Florida Water Management District, gets a closer look at moths which were lingering around after about 400 were released by Bob Pemberton, the lead scientist at the United States Department of Agriculture's agricultural research service's invasive plant research lab, Darrell Cole, South Atlantic Area Director of the U.S.D.A.'s agricultural research service, and U.S. Representative E. Clay Shaw, Jr. at a Lygodium-eating moth release ceremony at Jonathan Dickinson State Park in Hobe Sound. The army of leaf-eating moths were released after years of research, a team lead by Pemberton, that found that the insects eat Lygodium, a climbing fern that is spreading quickly through Florida's natural area, threatening Everglades restoration efforts.

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