Movie reviews: 'The Post,' 'The Commuter,' 'Call Me By Your Name,'

Read the latest film reviews, the most recent releases at the top.

  • 'Call Me by Your Name' review: At long last, first love

    'Call Me by Your Name' review: At long last, first love

    Set in the summer of 1983, in a land of leisurely alfresco lunches and spontaneous all-day bike rides under the northern Italian sun, the romantic idyll “Call Me by Your Name” is enough to make you move to the town of Crema, even if your rational self realizes the director Luca Guadagnino trades...

  • 'The Commuter' review: Murder on the Neeson Express

    'The Commuter' review: Murder on the Neeson Express

    There’s a moment in “The Commuter” when the newly unemployed insurance salesman and former cop played by Liam Neeson is informed that his adversaries will be coming after his wife and son. Have these fools not seen the “Taken” movies? Don’t they realize that such a threat is simply going to make...

  • 'I, Tonya' review: Blades of glory, and then ...

    'I, Tonya' review: Blades of glory, and then ...

    Naked on piles of money in “The Wolf of Wall Street,” popping in for a brief explanatory cameo in “The Big Short,” the Australian-born actress Margot Robbie has had several close cinematic encounters with a distinct brand of peppy, fact-based cynicism. It’s the tone, fashionable these days in black...

  • 'Paddington 2' review: More charming than the average bear

    'Paddington 2' review: More charming than the average bear

    Here’s hoping the forthcoming film version of “Peter Rabbit” is less awful than its trailers suggest. Reformulating Beatrix Potter as a brutish “Home Alone”/“Straw Dogs” melee, full of grim electrocutions, really does seem like a mistake. Meantime, fortunately, there’s “Paddington 2.” The sequel...

  • 'The Post' review: To stop, or not to stop, the presses?

    'The Post' review: To stop, or not to stop, the presses?

    My favorite moment in director Steven Spielberg’s “The Post” hinges on Meryl Streep’s delivery of the word “however.” It’s late in the film. Katharine Graham, The Washington Post’s publisher and company president, finds herself surrounded by the usual clutch of tense, murmuring male advisers behind...

  • Lin Shaye is a scream, but 'Insidious: The Last Key' doesn't click

    Lin Shaye is a scream, but 'Insidious: The Last Key' doesn't click

    With her mesmerizing gaze, her cavern of a mouth and a demeanor that manages to be at once soothing and steely, Lin Shaye isn’t just a scream queen for the ages. She’s one of those character actors you’d gladly follow anywhere: through a dank basement, down a sewer pipe and even into a vehicle...

  • 'All the Money in the World' review: Plummer seamlessly subs for Spacey

    'All the Money in the World' review: Plummer seamlessly subs for Spacey

    What’s the going rate for a Spacey-ectomy? Ten million dollars isn’t all the money in the world, but it’s a lot. And it’s the amount director Ridley Scott’s backers paid to remove Kevin Spacey from an already completed version of the brisk, medium-good kidnapping drama “All the Money in the World.”...

  • 'Downsizing' review: Alexander Payne has so little to say

    'Downsizing' review: Alexander Payne has so little to say

    Director Alexander Payne got our votes when he offered a brilliantly satirical look at politics and popularity with his insightful high school-based comedy "Election." He showed with "Sideways" that he could present a story as firm and dry as a prized red wine. He's done neither with his latest...

  • 'Molly's Game' review: Sorkin deals Jessica Chastain a winning hand

    'Molly's Game' review: Sorkin deals Jessica Chastain a winning hand

    Molly Bloom’s 2014 memoir “Molly’s Game” was more of a tell-some than a tell-all. In the book, the former freestyle skiing Olympic hopeful discussed the accident that derailed her athletic career. Mainly, she wrote about her improbable career running a pricey, underground poker game in Los Angeles...

  • 'Father Figures' review: Road trip movie steers Ed Helms, Owen Wilson in wrong direction

    'Father Figures' review: Road trip movie steers Ed Helms, Owen Wilson in wrong direction

    "Father Figures" is a movie, ostensibly. I'm pretty sure it is. Moving images were projected, along with recorded sound, which indicates it is a movie, but the effect was so listless, low-energy and profoundly unentertaining that I jotted down in my notes "what even IS this?" It would be more accurate...

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