The Villages

Eleanor Strickland, pictured here at home Friday, is a resident of The VIllages. The cover of Andrew Blechman's book looks harmless enough: a row of houses, a pool, a golf course, a tennis court. "Leisureville: Adventures in America's Retirement Utopias" even sounds complimentary to any self-respecting resident of The Villages. But it's not. The book, which hit stores about a week ago in the megaretirement community northwest of Orlando and around the nation, is highly critical of "Florida's friendliest hometown," the key example in Blechman's 244-page critique of age-segregated retirement communities.

( TOM BENITEZ, ORLANDO SENTINEL / May 3, 2008 )

Eleanor Strickland, pictured here at home Friday, is a resident of The VIllages. The cover of Andrew Blechman's book looks harmless enough: a row of houses, a pool, a golf course, a tennis court. "Leisureville: Adventures in America's Retirement Utopias" even sounds complimentary to any self-respecting resident of The Villages. But it's not. The book, which hit stores about a week ago in the megaretirement community northwest of Orlando and around the nation, is highly critical of "Florida's friendliest hometown," the key example in Blechman's 244-page critique of age-segregated retirement communities.

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