Doctor Vanishes on "Fly Fishing" Trip

State Park Police joined forces with Suffolk County cops for a third day, searching during torrential downpours for 76 year old doctor, Jerome Nadler, who disappeared in Caleb Smith State Park during a "fly fishing" excursion on Labor Day morning

"The search is ongoing, they're working very hard," Nadler's son told PIX 11, referring to the teams of police and civilian volunteers who are looking through hundreds of acres of parkland and waterways for the missing doctor.

Nadler disappeared in the south side of the park, off Jericho Turnpike in Smithtown. 

Chief Richard O'Donnell of the New York State Park Police told PIX 11 helicopters are being utilized, canine teams,

boats, divers, and searches that are being conducted on foot.  When PIX 11 asked the chief about the depth of the Nissequogue River, which cuts through the park, he responded, "Much of it is fairly shallow....two feet, maybe one foot.  Then, parts get deeper, maybe four or five feet."  O'Donnell said the search would move to ponds and wetlands that are even deeper, about eight to ten feet.

Dr. Nadler, who retired from his profession after a forty year practice, signed in with the park on Labor Day morning at 6:30 am to go "fly fishing". He parked his car and left his wallet inside. He was supposed to be back by 11 am.  When he didn't turn up by 1 pm, rangers notified his wife in Setauket, Long Island.

The "Missing Person" poster being distributed shows a smiling Nadler on a sailboat. He was considered to be an experienced sailor and fisherman.  The poster indicated Nadler was wearing fishing waders and boots on Monday, carrying a fishing pole and fly fishing gear.  He was wearing a blue shirt and khaki vest. 

His family said he was in good health, although some reports said Nadler has a heart condition.  Police are theorizing he may have slipped or had a sudden medical emergency. 

Volunteers from the Long Island K-9 Search and Rescue group showed up at the state park Wednesday afternoon to offer their services.  Chris Padden, one of the volunteers, described the terrain of the park: "In this area, it's more marshy, with dense woods, so that's where we'll search."  Padden added, "The brush is so heavily wooded that if you're in that area, you have to know where to look."

Dr. Nadler's daughter, Jill, flew up from Orlando, Florida, to wait for word with her mother and brother.  The family

was ushered by police to one of the historic homes on the park site.  Park police in a different room continued to go over maps of the site to figure out the next spot to search.