This is in response to a June 5 letter by Bob Tanabe, “Not another stupid gun law.”

He feels that everyone should have the right to openly display firearms and that a proposed law to ban such displays is stupid and shows a hatred by liberals for “guns and law abiding gun owners.”

I don't consider myself a “bleeding heart liberal,” and I favor issuing concealed weapons permits to people whose lives are in danger, but I take issue with this line of reasoning. Sorry, Bob, but I wouldn't feel particularly safe among a group of people equipped with potential weapons of mass destruction.

How do I know that the guy next to me is carrying an unloaded weapon? Since there are no laws requiring weapons carriers to be licensed, how do I know he isn't a lunatic? In a matter of seconds, he could pull a banana clip out of his pocket and mow down a room full of people.

I think openly displaying a weapon presents a grave danger to the carrier, too. Police often shoot armed people they think are a threat, justifiably or not. Also, just as openly displaying an expensive Rolex watch invites assault by bad guys, an openly displayed weapon invites similar problems.

How many times have we read of a police officer who is relieved of his service revolver by a criminal, and then has to rely on his backup weapon?

Steven Asimow

Glendale


In praise of Dan Kimber

My husband and I enjoy the Education Matters column regularly, and I especially enjoyed reading Dan Kimber’s description of driving in Italy (“Of roundabouts, Vespas and sheep,” June 10). It brought me back to my own experience navigating the winding, narrow lanes of Tuscan towns.

I have my own Italian driving “rules” now: Road maps are impressionistic, traffic signs are suggestions, when engulfed by a flock of Vespas just keep moving — same rule applies for traffic circles (keep circling until you spot your exit). Once I had established these rules, I found driving in Italy to be a fun experience.

Like Kimber, I like the traffic circles. I've encountered two or three here in Glendale, but they are ruined by the use of stop signs.

And thanks to Kimber for his comments on national pride, too. Patriotism should include that drive to keep our nation learning and working to be the best.

Yvonne Burch-Hartley

Glendale