Biography

Cal Thomas is America's number one nationally syndicated political columnist. With a twice-weekly column appearing in more than 500 ...

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Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas

Scotland's future hangs in balance

August 28, 2014

"The best laid schemes of mice and men often go awry." -- Scottish poet Robert Burns, "To a Mouse" (1786)

  • If ISIS attacks again, what will U.S. do?

    August 26, 2014

    The Obama administration is reportedly considering airstrikes in Syria against the terrorist group ISIS. The New York Times quotes "a top national security adviser" to the president as saying the U.S. is "'not going to be restricted by borders' to protect its interests..."

  • ISIS 'a national security threat'

    August 21, 2014

    BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- U.S. airstrikes that have helped Iraqi and Kurdish forces recapture a strategic dam and halt, at least temporarily, the advance of ISIS terrorists on the Kurdish capital of Erbil are a welcome pushback against a relentless enemy that for a time seemed invincible. But it may be of no more strategic significance than Jimmy Doolittle's bombing run against Japan in World War II. Doolittle's raid gave a psychological boost to the United States, but it had to be followed by much sterner stuff before victory was achieved.

  • Theater of the Absurd in Ferguson, Missouri

    August 19, 2014

    It was in a college theater class that I learned about a genre called "Theater of the Absurd." These were plays written mostly by European playwrights between the 1940s and 1960s, as well as a certain style that flowed from their work.

  • Robin Williams: Comedy and tragedy

    August 14, 2014

    Robin Williams made me cry. Like his mentor, the late Jonathan Winters, Williams, who committed suicide Monday, made me laugh so intensely tears would come to my eyes.

  • Confronting ISIS -- 'It takes an army to defeat an army'

    August 12, 2014

    When liberal Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) and the conservative former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich agree on something, attention should be paid.

  • The Nixon resignation at 40

    August 7, 2014

    On the occasion of this week's 40th anniversary of Richard Nixon's resignation from the presidency, The Washington Post sponsored a reunion featuring Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, the Watergate reporters who "brought down" the 37th president.

  • People, not politicians improve world economies

    August 5, 2014

    STRATFORD-UPON-AVON, England -- "Neither a borrower nor a lender be; for loan oft loses both itself and friend, and borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry." -- "Hamlet," Act I, Scene III

  • WWI, the not so great war

    July 31, 2014

    NEWBURY, England -- World War I began as most wars do with patriotic fervor and predictions of a quick end. It lasted four years.

  • Lois Lowry's 'The Giver' a portent of what might be?

    July 29, 2014

    With his approval numbers sinking to 39 percent a week ago, according to the Gallup tracking poll, President Obama isn't alone in having a bad summer. So is Hollywood.

  • No more aid to the Palestinian Authority

    July 28, 2014

    The anti-Semitic "tradition" of blaming Jews for the world's problems mostly took a temporary back seat in light of the indiscriminate rocket attacks on Israel by the terrorist group Hamas.

  • Rick Perry's bold border move

    July 24, 2014

    Gov. Rick Perry of Texas plans to order 1,000 National Guard troops to his state's border with Mexico in an effort to stem the tide of immigrants illegally entering from Central America, dispersing around the country once they've made it into Texas.

  • Are black voters turning against Obama?

    July 17, 2014

    It may be too soon to label it a trend and there is insufficient data to confirm it, but President Obama and his party may be losing their iron grip on their most loyal and enthusiastic voting bloc: African-Americans.

  • Don't fence me in

    July 15, 2014

    At last, an Obama administration official has come out in favor of a fence. He promises it will bring security to people on both sides of the border.

  • Chicago: A town that won't let you down?

    July 10, 2014

    Frank Sinatra's song about Chicago, "My Kind of Town," "a the town that won't let you down," seems dated in light of last weekend's shooting spree that left 16 dead and dozens wounded in 53 separate incidents. According to the Chicago Tribune, "The victims were among 82 people shot between Thursday afternoon and early Monday."

  • Constitution, not illegal immigration is 'central to our way of life'

    July 8, 2014

    The cab driver taking me to the Washington Nationals baseball game on July 4 is from Bangladesh. I ask him how he got here. He said his father "won the immigration lottery" some years back, was admitted under U.S. immigration law and eventually became a citizen, as did his son. He is proud to be an American and said after he dropped me off he was going to a traditional Fourth of July party to celebrate America's independence.

  • Louis Zamperini and Memorial Day

    July 4, 2014

    Prior to Memorial Day, 2011, Louis Zamperini visited Washington, D.C., where I had the pleasure of meeting and interviewing him. The man was as sharp as the proverbial tack. He inscribed Laura Hillenbrand's bestselling biography, "Unbroken" to me with "Be Hardy." And he was. This is the column I wrote about him and what he stood for. The film of the book, directed by Angelina Jolie, will be released in December.

  • America's DNA: 'The Federalist Papers'

    July 3, 2014

    There are many ways to lose freedom -- conquering armies, surrendering without a fight. Unfortunately, we are currently surrendering our freedom, not to a foreign power, but to our own government.

  • Our arrogant president

    July 1, 2014

    President Obama appears to have forgotten -- or ignored -- why we have elections. One reason is to stop, or slow down, an agenda the public doesn't like.

  • No denying climate change deniers

    June 26, 2014

    People who refuse to drink the Kool-Aid known as global warming-climate change are not just "deniers"; we are guilty of a "nihilistic refusal" to address the issue. So says a Washington Post editorial commenting favorably on Monday's Supreme Court ruling that allows the Environmental Protection Agency, under certain limits, to proceed under the Clean Air Act to regulate major sources of greenhouse-gas emissions.

  • The difference between Republicans and Democrats

    June 24, 2014

    It is a line I have used to open speeches on the lecture circuit for years and it never fails to get a laugh: "I'm happy to be here tonight from Washington, D.C., where the only politicians with convictions are in prison."

  • U.S. troops return to Iraq ... too little, too late?

    June 19, 2014

    George W. Bush never claimed to be prescient, but here he is in 2007, warning us what would happen if the United States prematurely pulled its troops out of Iraq before Iraqi forces were sufficiently trained, equipped and motivated to defend the country we gave back to them after the ouster of Saddam Hussein:

  • Iraq is on its own!

    June 17, 2014

    "It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us -- that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion -- that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain..." (The Gettysburg Address)

  • Ready for Hillary?

    June 12, 2014

    I expected nothing but effusive praise from major media for Hillary Clinton's new book, "Hard Choices," much like the mass exaltation it showered on Barack Obama, America's first African-American president.

  • Israel is not America

    June 10, 2014

    Defenders of President Obama's release of five Taliban terrorists from the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in exchange for Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl cite as justification Israel's history of swapping hundreds of Palestinian prisoners for one or two Israel soldiers.

  • D-Day is dumb day for too many

    June 5, 2014

    Given the numerous studies revealing how American education lags behind instruction in other countries in disciplines once thought to be essential, it should come as no surprise that on the 70th anniversary of D-Day, a lot of people are clueless about central elements of the Allied invasion of the European continent on June 6, 1944.

  • D-Day is dumb day for too many

    June 5, 2014

    Given the numerous studies revealing how American education lags behind instruction in other countries in disciplines once thought to be essential, it should come as no surprise that on the 70th anniversary of D-Day, a lot of people are clueless about central elements of the Allied invasion of the European continent on June 6, 1944.

  • Negotiating with terrorists

    June 3, 2014

    Euphoria over the Taliban's release of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl was quickly tempered by media reports that Bergdahl had abandoned his post and that his father made comments opposing the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Bergdahl's father tweeted, "I am still working to free all Guantanamo prisoners. God will repay for the death of every Afghan child."

  • The tea party lives -- in Europe

    May 29, 2014

    BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- While Tea Party candidates underperformed against establishment Republican incumbents in recent U.S. primary elections, in Europe their conservative cousins have just scored some spectacular victories.

  • The Rich List and the West's culture of envy

    May 27, 2014

    BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- In the 1970s, while working as a low-paid cub reporter in Houston, Texas, I always looked forward to the annual Christmas catalogs from Neiman-Marcus and Sakowitz, a local luxury department store. Both contained outrageously expensive things that only the super-rich could afford -- his and hers Thunderbirds stick in my memory. My wife and I couldn't wait to thumb through them and we frequently laughed at how much some of the items cost, wondering if even rich Texans would spend so extravagantly.

  • The VA, the NHS and choice

    May 22, 2014

    PORTSTEWART, Northern Ireland -- President Obama Wednesday replayed a familiar scenario when dealing with scandal, in this case delays for treatment, deaths, alleged cover-ups and other acts of malfeasance reported at Veterans Administration hospitals in the United States: first express outrage, next announce an investigation and then say he won't comment on the scandal until the results of the investigation are in, promising people will be held "accountable," if they violated the law. Good luck with that.

  • Hillary's health matters

    May 20, 2014

    Karl Rove, the bete noir for Democrats (and some Republicans), has dared to raise questions about Hillary Clinton's health.

  • Free speech not so free when discussing gay rights

    May 15, 2014

    Once, Social Security was the "third rail" of politics. Touch it and face political death. Now it is homosexuality. Criticize anything gay people do and you risk ostracism, fines, suspension or loss of your livelihood.

  • First redistribute Vatican wealth

    May 13, 2014

    I have great respect for the humility displayed by Pope Francis, but in his latest call for the "legitimate" redistribution of wealth, he has it backward. Instead of taking more money from those who have earned it, he should advocate for creating new wealth.

  • Supreme Court rules 5-4 on public prayer

    May 8, 2014

    Ever since the Supreme Court ruled organized prayer and Bible study in public schools unconstitutional in the early 1960s, conservative Christians have been trying to re-enter the secular arena.

  • Government waste: Where has all the money gone?

    May 6, 2014

    Most people, perhaps even the super-wealthy, who are usually accountable to auditors, want to know where their money goes. This is especially true when they detect money for which they can't account. Not so with the federal government.

  • Hillary Clinton's 'social gospel' good enough for Democrats

    May 1, 2014

    Faith is making a comeback among liberal Democrats, but they still have a way to go.

  • Kerry's folly

    April 10, 2014

    After his spectacular, but predictable, failure to move forward the "peace process" between Israel and the Palestinian side, Secretary of State John Kerry says the United States will now "evaluate" its role in the Middle East.

  • Focus on what works

    April 8, 2014

    The Fiscal Times reported last week that the State Department has missing files or incomplete files for more than $6 billion in State Department contracts. Steve Linick, State's inspector general, issued a "management alert" warning that "significant financial risk and a lack of internal control at the department has led to billions of unaccounted for dollars over the last six years."

  • The ABC's of school choice

    April 3, 2014

    When people speak of a legacy, they usually mean something other than what the late economist Milton Friedman and his wife, Rose, left behind, namely the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice (edchoice.org).

  • Much ado about Noah

    April 1, 2014

    It wasn't so long ago that conservative Christians believed Hollywood to be evil and some preachers instructed their congregations not to go to movies lest they be tempted beyond their ability to resist. Now Christians are debating film content. That's progress of a sort.

  • God and Caesar (again)

    March 27, 2014

    "Well, then," Jesus said, "give to Caesar what belongs to Caesar, and give to God what belongs to God." (Mark 12:17 Living Paraphrase)

  • Fred Phelps: Satan's servant

    March 25, 2014

    My parents taught me never to speak ill of the dead, but in the case of Fred Phelps, who died last week at the age of 84, I think they would have made an exception.

  • Humiliation nation(s)

    March 20, 2014

    What is it about Western leaders from Neville Chamberlain to George W. Bush who want to find good in men of bad character?

  • Missing: A foreign policy

    March 18, 2014

    What happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 may eventually be discovered, but there is something else that has been missing for much longer and its "disappearance" has far greater implications for America. It is our foreign policy. Can anyone say what it is?

  • Getting satisfaction

    March 13, 2014

    Every year we are subjected to lists. Forbe's magazine lists the world's wealthiest individuals. Time magazine lists the most "influential" people, though real influence is difficult to define or quantify.

  • Stormtroopers, a Wookiee and CPAC

    March 11, 2014

    OXON HILL, Md. -- The first "people" I recognized on arriving at last week's Conservative Political Action Committee gathering just outside Washington were two "stormtroopers" and a Wookiee from the 1977 film "Star Wars."

  • Pressuring the wrong country

    March 6, 2014

    The Obama administration is showing it can be tough on foreign policy. Unfortunately, that toughness is not directed at Russia and its incursion into Crimea, but at Israel, America's ally.

  • Let them eat cake

    March 4, 2014

    In Arizona has come a test of the motto conservative Christians like to invoke: "Hate the sin, love the sinner."

  • Is Cruz out of control?

    February 27, 2014

    What you think of Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas) depends on who you believe.

  • Separation of government from press

    February 25, 2014

    After much criticism from conservative quarters, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has decided, at least for now, to withdraw plans for its proposed study of how media organizations gather and report news. The expressed goal of the survey was to determine if the "critical information needs" of the public are being met. In making the announcement on Friday, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler indicated the survey would be "revised" and that the government agency had "no intention" of regulating political speech of journalists or other broadcasters.

  • Separation of government from press

    February 25, 2014

    After much criticism from conservative quarters, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has decided, at least for now, to withdraw plans for its proposed study of how media organizations gather and report news. The expressed goal of the survey was to determine if the "critical information needs" of the public are being met. In making the announcement on Friday, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler indicated the survey would be "revised" and that the government agency had "no intention" of regulating political speech of journalists or other broadcasters.

  • Back to the past: Not a winning formula for GOP

    February 20, 2014

    Kathleen Willey is back. For people who have forgotten, she is the former volunteer aide to President Bill Clinton who claims he sexually harassed her 20 years ago. She wrote a book about it called "Target: Caught in the Crosshairs of Bill and Hillary Clinton."

  • Michele Bachmann: Undeterred and undiminished

    February 18, 2014

    With less than a year left in her fourth and final term in Congress, it's a little early for an exit interview, but not too early to get the views of Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN) on issues dear to a "founding mother" of the Tea Party movement and on how to beat Hillary Clinton in 2016, if the Democrat decides to run.

  • Taking the law into his own hands

    February 13, 2014

    "If at my convenience I might break them (laws), what would be their worth?" -- Charlotte Bronte, "Jane Eyre"

  • A trust deficit

    February 11, 2014

    Most people accept the notion that politicians don't always tell the truth. Some lies are harmless enough; others more consequential.

  • 'Alone Yet Not Alone' vs. Academy's 'ethics'

    February 6, 2014

    In a world where Woody Allen can get a lifetime achievement award at the Golden Globes at the same time his adopted daughter accuses him of sexually abusing her when she was a child (Allen has repeatedly denied it), and where a film "The Wolf of Wall Street" sets a record for use of the F-word, it is a wonderment that an obscure, low-budget film called "Alone Yet Not Alone" has had its Best Original Song Oscar nomination withdrawn for allegedly violating ethical rules.

  • Retreating on illegal immigration

    February 4, 2014

    At a time when Republicans have Democrats playing defense on Obamacare, jobs and the economy, the GOP is inexplicably ceding political ground to the Democrats on an issue that can only provide more votes for that party and possibly lead to a permanent Democratic majority.

  • State of the Union 2014

    January 30, 2014

    Suppose a president of the United States delivered a State of the Union address and nobody cared? Isn't that what happened Tuesday night when the increasingly irrelevant -- and, yes, boring Barack Obama -- droned on about predictable things in a predictable way? We have been forced to listen to him so many times (often several times in a single day) that it could qualify as cruel and unusual punishment in violation of the Constitution.

  • Jay Leno: Mr. Nice Guy

    January 28, 2014

    Anyone in the news business will tell you that a side benefit is the diverse number of people one gets to meet.

  • Cuomo to conservatives: Leave New York

    January 23, 2014

    Everyone "knows" it is conservatives who are mean-spirited, intolerant, censors of speech with which they don't agree, anti-gay, anti-black and anti just about everything else, right? We know this because the left keeps telling us so.

  • The shame of Benghazi

    January 21, 2014

    When anything bipartisan comes out of a polarized Washington, one should be grateful. That's why a Senate Intelligence Committee report on the September 11, 2012 attacks in Benghazi, Libya, that killed U.S. Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans represents progress of sorts.

  • The NHS: Dogma vs. experience

    January 15, 2014

    BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- While the Obama administration offers life support to its Affordable Care Act, in the UK a growing number of people are asking whether it's time to pull the plug on the National Health Service (NHS), which is in critical condition.

  • A political bridge too far

    January 14, 2014

    A multiple choice question: Select the scandal(s) that affects the most people and has long-term implications for the country in a time of war, a country with a struggling economy that last month produced the weakest job growth in decades. (According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), nearly 92 million Americans are no longer in the labor force.)

  • Interview with Ariel Sharon

    January 13, 2014

    (NOTICE. For retransmission or other content delivery inquiries, please contact TCA Customer Service, 1-800-346-8798, tcacustomerservice@tribune.com.)

  • Bye, Bye Phil Everly

    January 9, 2014

    One mark of a good song is that it makes Billboard's top 10 list. An even greater indicator is its staying power; whether it is remembered decades after it was a hit. Perhaps the highest accolade is whether the artist influences other musicians. All of these standards were met by the singing duo the Everly Brothers, one of whom, Phil, has died days shy of his 75th birthday.

  • Ideology vs. reality

    January 7, 2014

    French President Francois Hollande has been confronted by the glaring light of reality -- sort of.

  • Ideology vs. reality

    January 7, 2014

    French President Francois Hollande has been confronted by the glaring light of reality -- sort of.

  • The war on poverty at 50

    January 2, 2014

    In his State of the Union address on Jan. 8, 1964, President Lyndon Johnson declared a "war on poverty." Today, with roughly the same number of people below the poverty level as in 1964 and with many addicted to government "benefits," robbing them of a work ethic, it is clear that the poor have mostly lost the war.

  • Not getting what we pay for

    December 31, 2013

    In real life when you find yourself paying more and getting less, you usually search for another product or service. With the federal government, it isn't possible to take your business elsewhere unless you are prepared to give up your citizenship, as some have done. Such a drastic step is rejected by most of us because we still believe in the ideal that once was America, though not in the direction in which the country is currently headed.

  • A Duck Dynasty checklist

    December 26, 2013

    The outrage industry was in high dudgeon just before Christmas over remarks "Duck Dynasty" family patriarch, Phil Robertson, made to GQ magazine about homosexuality. Outrage is the primary ingredient for political fundraising and political power. One must always have an enemy.

  • A gift that will keep on giving

    December 24, 2013

    Each year during the period of conspicuous consumption known as Christmas shopping, I try to think of a gift that will not be returned, exchanged or forgotten before next Christmas. One year it was a goat for a poor African farmer through World Vision. Another year it was a sewing machine for a woman in Ghana who wanted to lift herself out of poverty by starting a small business.

  • Big Brother 2013

    December 19, 2013

    In his classic novel "1984," George Orwell warned about the evils of a totalitarian state dominated by a single ruling party with total power over its inhabitants. Oceania, his fictional superstate, is under complete surveillance by the authorities. The character known as "Big Brother" reminds everyone he is constantly monitoring the citizens of Oceania, mainly by "telescreen."

  • Culture of death (continued)

    December 17, 2013

    During the Christmas season when many celebrate a unique and miraculous birth, what the late Pope John Paul II called "a culture of death" continues its march.

  • Income 'inequality'

    December 12, 2013

    In a December 4 speech, President Obama declared income "inequality" to be "the defining challenge of our time."

  • Two Mandelas

    December 10, 2013

    When John Lofton of The Washington Times and I were granted an interview with Nelson Mandela inside Pollsmoor Prison near Capetown, South Africa, in August 1985, it was a rare occurrence, personally approved by then-South African President P.W. Botha over the objections of his foreign minister.

  • Detroit's decline didn't have to happen

    December 5, 2013

    U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Steven Rhodes has ruled that Detroit, Mich., may seek to protect itself from its creditors under Chapter 9 municipal bankruptcy protection, thus making this once proud city the largest municipality in American history to go bust.

  • Black Friday: Dark night rises

    December 3, 2013

    "If everyone demanded peace instead of another television set, then there'd be peace." -- John Lennon

  • Obama finds a way to ruin Thanksgiving

    November 28, 2013

    For some, Thanksgiving is difficult enough with abrasive relatives gobbling up your food without a scintilla of gratitude. Now President Obama comes along with a proposal that could cause turmoil in even the happiest of homes.

  • Obama's Munich

    November 26, 2013

    Seeking to create an analogy with the deal the United States negotiated with Iran to supposedly limit further production of its centrifuges, Secretary of State John Kerry chose to recall disarmament agreements between the United States and the Soviet Union.

  • A personal JFK remembrance

    November 21, 2013

    My parents voted for Richard Nixon in the 1960 presidential election. I had not yet developed a political worldview, but as a freshman at American University in Washington, D.C., I stayed up late to watch the election returns slowly trickle in before going to bed at 2 a.m. with the outcome still undecided.

  • Sen. David Long's bold play for an Article V convention

    November 19, 2013

    Fed up with Washington? Angry that elections don't seem to matter when it comes time to solving problems? Disgusted by the polarization that puts politicians' careers ahead of taxpayer interests? Frustrated because you don't think anything can be done about it?

  • Kennedy, Huxley and Lewis

    November 15, 2013

    Three famous men died on Nov. 22, 1963. The one getting the most attention, understandably, is John F. Kennedy. Less so the other two: Aldous Huxley, author of the futuristic novel "Brave New World," and Clive Staples Lewis.

  • Kennedy, Huxley and Lewis

    November 14, 2013

    Three famous men died on Nov. 22, 1963. The one getting the most attention, understandably, is John F. Kennedy. Less so the other two: Aldous Huxley, author of the futuristic novel "Brave New World," and Clive Staples Lewis.

  • The coming betrayal of Israel

    November 12, 2013

    In Geneva, Switzerland, The United States and other major powers appeared close to a deal with Iran to curb its nuclear program in exchange for lifting some economic sanctions against the terrorist-sponsoring state. Negotiations, however, fell apart at the last minute when France and Iran balked at the final wording on the interim draft. Talks are expected to resume within a few weeks, but it is worth pausing to consider what was nearly agreed to and what the outcome could likely be.

  • Jonathan Pollard -- the 'spy' still out in the cold

    November 11, 2013

    With all the spying the United States has been doing on foreign leaders, possibly including the pope, why is Jonathan Pollard, a former American civilian intelligence analyst, still in prison nearly three decades after being sentenced to life in prison for taking classified documents he believed contained information important to Israel's self-defense?

  • Is Christie the one?

    November 7, 2013

    Last August before a closed meeting of Republican leaders in Boston, Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey said, "We are not a debating society. We are a political operation that needs to win."

  • Greece, N.Y., enters debate on public prayer

    November 5, 2013

    The Supreme Court will hear arguments this week about prayers in public life, this latest deliberation revolving around a case from Greece, N.Y., and the recitation of prayers during town board meetings. The board used to begin each of its meetings with a moment of silence. When that moment of silence was replaced by spoken prayers, they turned out to be overwhelmingly Christian, and a suit was filed. Last year a federal appeals court ruled, according to The Washington Post, "...that such a 'steady drumbeat' of Christian invocations violates the Constitution's prohibition against government endorsement of religion."

  • What will happen to Afghan women when the Taliban returns?

    October 31, 2013

    When the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan is completed next year what will happen to Afghan women? Will a resurgent Taliban return them to wearing burqas, withdraw them from schools and force them to live behind painted glass in their homes, permitting them to leave the house only when accompanied by a blood relative?

  • Hey GOP: Put on a happy face

    October 29, 2013

    "Bye Bye Birdie" is an old musical that survives in high school productions and in some people's memory bank. It debuted on Broadway in 1960 and was made into a film in 1963. One of the songs from the show might serve as an inspiration, if not a theme, for Republicans in the winter of their discontent over President Obama and congressional Democrats: "Put on a Happy Face."

  • Obama in wonderland

    October 24, 2013

    "Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast." -- The White Queen, "Alice in Wonderland"

  • Obama in wonderland

    October 24, 2013

    "Why, sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast." The White Queen, "Alice in Wonderland"

  • Just say 'no' to underwriting more debt

    October 22, 2013

    The fiasco in Washington over the partial government shutdown, raising the debt ceiling and deepening animosity between Republicans and Democrats (and Republicans and Republicans), has left many asking if there is any way out of this bitter, endless cycle. There may be.

  • Henry Louis Gates returns with 'The African Americans'

    October 17, 2013

    Can something as tragic and immoral as slavery become, if not less tragic, then noble, even righteous, in the telling? It can and it does in the capable hands of Harvard Professor Henry Louis Gates Jr., whose brilliant and compelling new six-part series for PBS called "The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross" premieres Oct. 22 (check local listings).

  • The 'bums' aren't the problem: We are

    October 15, 2013

    A new Associated Press-GfK poll reveals some troubling statistics for members of both major political parties, if they can be troubled, given what looks to be their lack of concern for what they are doing to the country.

  • Culture's casualties

    October 10, 2013

    It's the 40th anniversary of Erica Jong's "Fear of Flying," which some have described as a breakthrough book for women and for modern feminism.

  • An American comeback

    October 8, 2013

    With frustration building over Washington's refusal to behave in the public interest, perhaps it's worth noting a drastic solution tried by the Irish.

  • A Republican response to Obamacare

    October 3, 2013

    If Republicans were smart (I know, but stay with me) their focus during the Obamacare debate should have been less on blocking its implementation and more on a page they might have taken from the Democrat's playbook, which is to rally the country to its side by use of sentimentality and the threat of impending doom. The good news for Republicans is that there's still time.

  • The downside of orthodoxy

    September 27, 2013

    It's a safe bet that most conservative Republicans would rush to support a political leader with the following record, especially in a traditionally Democratic state:

  • What price U.S. citizenship?

    September 27, 2013

    HONG KONG -- We read about famous people like French film star Gerard Depardieu, who moved to Belgium to avoid a 75 percent income tax on millionaires proposed by France's Socialist government (a measure rejected last week by a French council, though French leadership has vowed to resubmit a similar proposal). Then there is Eduardo Saverin, who took the extreme step of giving up his U.S. citizenship and could see a savings of $39 million on his Facebook investment, according to the research firm Wealth-X. He says business reasons, rather than high taxes, were his primary motivation.

  • Extortionist in chief

    September 27, 2013

    At the end of 1995 and stretching into January 1996, the federal government "shut down" because of an impasse between President Bill Clinton and House Republicans led by then-House Speaker Newt Gingrich. The issue was increased taxes vs. less spending. Sound familiar? The government re-opened when a bipartisan agreement was reached to balance the budget by 2003. It wasn't for reasons that included, but were not limited to, two wars. Now the national debt is racing toward an unsustainable $17 trillion.

  • Beware public opinion

    September 27, 2013

    "If there is anything that links the human to the divine, it is the courage to stand by a principle when everybody else rejects it." -- Abraham Lincoln

  • School for scandal

    September 27, 2013

    My first question after reading about seven teachers in an Atlanta, Ga., public school accused of altering standardized test scores to make it appear students performed better than they actually did was: How could they!?

  • No boundaries, big problem

    September 27, 2013

    One of the consequences of abandoning a standard by which right and wrong can be judged is our increasing inability to mete out punishment that fits the crime. In fact, too often we weigh extenuating circumstances rather than guilty actions.

  • Taxing Internet sales

    September 27, 2013

    In 1998 when President Clinton signed the bipartisan Internet Tax Freedom Act, which prohibited state and local taxation of Internet access and Internet-only services, the purpose was to promote the commercial potential of the Internet, especially for start-ups and small businesses. Congress extended the bill three times, the latest until 2014.

  • (Dole)ing out blame for gridlock

    September 27, 2013

    Who doesn't admire former Republican Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole? Wounded World War II veteran, part-time comedian (Dole once described a meeting of former presidents Carter, Ford and Nixon as "see no evil, hear no evil -- and evil"), former presidential candidate and all-around decent man, Dole was a part of government for much of his life.

  • GOP: R.I.P.?

    September 27, 2013

    Some political commentators are dancing on what they believe to be the grave of the Republican Party, claiming that the only way the GOP can have a viable future is for them to behave like Democrats.

  • Bombed in Boston

    September 27, 2013

    President Obama rightly asked us not to "jump to conclusions" about motives or responsibility for the two bombs that exploded Monday at the Boston Marathon, killing three and wounding more than 170.

  • Roe v. Wade at 40

    September 27, 2013

    At last week's signing of "executive actions" designed to combat gun violence in America, President Obama, flanked by schoolchildren, said, "...when it comes to protecting the most vulnerable among us, we must act now."

  • Big government 2.0

    September 27, 2013

    Bill Clinton isn't often wrong when it comes to politics, but his assertion in his 1996 State of the Union Address that "the era of big government is over" was a bit premature. In light of President Obama's Second Inaugural Address, the era of big government has just begun.

  • The perfect gift

    September 27, 2013

    Most people who haven't finished their shopping are starting to worry about what gifts to give a friend, relative or spouse. Quick, what did you give or receive last year? How about two years ago? Most of us can't remember, unless it was a big-ticket item.

  • Vietnam Plus-50

    September 27, 2013

    HANOI, Vietnam -- It has been 50 years since President John F. Kennedy ordered U.S. "advisers" to South Vietnam to help battle the communist North and 37 years since the end of that divisive war and the country's unification under Communism.

  • Control politicians, not guns

    September 27, 2013

    If laws were enough to deter criminal behavior prisons would be empty.

  • Would things go better with Koch?

    September 27, 2013

    "Mainstream media" are alarmed by reports that billionaires Charles and David Koch are considering the purchase of Tribune Company's eight daily newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times.

  • Immigration deformed

    September 27, 2013

    There's the story of a woman with five kids who was asked if she had to do it all over again would she have five children?

  • An imperial president

    September 27, 2013

    One definition of "imperial" on dictionary.com is, "of the nature or rank of an emperor or supreme ruler."

  • Two prime ministers

    September 27, 2013

    Following the hacking death of a British soldier by two alleged Islamic extremists, Prime Minister David Cameron said, "There is nothing in Islam that justifies this truly dreadful act."

  • Ryan's hope

    September 27, 2013

    House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) is looking beyond Friday and the beginning of the sequestration.

  • Gov. Scott to voters: Never mind

    September 27, 2013

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Gov. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) was one of those tea party stars whom voters believed had the courage of his convictions when he promised, as recently as last summer, to block The Affordable Care Act in his state. But last week, writes the Orlando Sentinel, "Scott made an abrupt about-face, embracing a three-year expansion of Medicaid coverage for about 1 million low-income Floridians that will be paid for by the health care law."

  • Four more years of decline

    September 27, 2013

    Great nations and proud empires have always collapsed from within before they were conquered from without.

  • The double threats

    September 27, 2013

    Just as Lenin's body remains on public display in Russia, because one never knows when he might be useful to rally the masses, so, too, does the ghost (but thankfully not the body) of the late Joseph McCarthy (R-Wis.) remain a useful symbol for Democrats in Washington.

  • Sequesterville

    September 27, 2013

    The Broadway musical "Annie" is enjoying another revival on Broadway. The show opened during the Carter administration when America was in need of some optimism. "The sun'll come out tomorrow," sang Annie, and with the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980, for a while, it did.

  • Government shouldn't define 'church'

    September 27, 2013

    Under pressure from religious and conservative groups, the Obama administration has offered another compromise on the issue of birth control coverage within the Affordable Care Act. While exempting churches and some religiously affiliated institutions, such as hospitals and universities, from supplying the coverage, the new proposal calls for their employees to receive stand-alone private insurance policies providing birth control coverage at no cost. Insurance companies will foot the bill, but only the naive can possibly think the cost won't find its way back to the institution in the form of higher health premiums.

  • Sex and the city (of Washington)

    September 27, 2013

    The resignation of CIA Director David Petraeus over an extramarital affair has raised and will continue to raise a number of questions.

  • Gov. Scott to voters: Never mind

    September 27, 2013

    ORLANDO, Fla. -- Gov. Rick Scott (R-Fla.) was one of those tea party stars whom voters believed had the courage of his convictions when he promised, as recently as last summer, to block The Affordable Care Act in his state. But last week, writes the Orlando Sentinel, "Scott made an abrupt about-face, embracing a three-year expansion of Medicaid coverage for about 1 million low-income Floridians that will be paid for by the health care law."

  • Islamists not ready for democracy

    September 27, 2013

    The military coup that ousted Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi marks another failure in U.S. foreign policy over several administrations, which have erroneously promoted the notion that American-style democracy in Islamic lands will produce a nation more like ours.

  • Who's a racist?

    September 27, 2013

    On MSNBC's Ed Schultz program Friday night, the former chief of staff for Colin Powell, retired Army Col. Lawrence Wilkerson, said, of the Republican Party, "My party is full of racists ... and the real reason a considerable portion of my party wants President Obama out of the White House has nothing to do with the content of his character, nothing to do with his competence as commander in chief and president, and everything to do with the color of his skin ... that's despicable."

  • No Standard

    September 27, 2013

    "For this reason a man shall leave his father and his mother, and be joined to his wife; and they shall become one flesh." -- Genesis 2:24, NIV

  • Independence Day plus 237

    September 27, 2013

    "Posterity! You will never know how much it cost the present generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you will make good use of it." -- John Quincy Adams

  • How to spell success

    September 27, 2013

    The annual ritual known as the Scripps National Spelling Bee came and went last week with kids spelling words that, I suspect, many with graduate degrees couldn't spell.

  • More of the same

    September 27, 2013

    Everything that everyone loathes about Washington was present in the "fiscal cliff" bill just passed by Congress. It is 153 pages long; most members probably hadn't read all of it before voting on it; it was delivered in the middle of the night; it was loaded with pork -- the mother's milk (to mix a metaphor) of politicians -- and while the country is already swamped with massive debt, it contains massive giveaways to satisfy interest groups and campaign contributors. Did I mention the bill raises taxes on top of the coming Obamacare taxes, but does nothing -- nothing -- to address the debt problem?

  • Back to the '50s

    September 27, 2013

    Addressing a meeting of Planned Parenthood last Friday, President Obama accused pro-lifers of wanting to "turn back the clock to policies more suited to the 1950s than the 21st century."

  • Climate change ice-capped

    September 27, 2013

    There is a tradition in politics that is similar to one in the legal profession: When evidence supports your position, make your argument based on the evidence, but when it argues against your position, ignore the evidence and appeal to emotion.

  • Changing America

    September 27, 2013

    "The color of the world is changing day by day." -- "Les Miserables," the musical

  • Why do liberals fear success?

    September 27, 2013

    There are many successful liberals, so why do so many of them wish to subsidize failure for the poor, instead of showing them how to succeed?

  • Meaningless concessions

    September 27, 2013

    Egypt is in turmoil again. Syria is embroiled in civil war. Iran continues building a nuclear device. Militants in Iraq have killed more than 4,000 people so far this year, more than 800 of them in July alone, according to the aptly named Iraq Body Count (http://www.iraqbodycount.org).

  • The president's Morehouse address

    September 27, 2013

    President Obama gave two commencement addresses in one to graduates of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Ga., last weekend. It would be easy for this conservative to critique the political and social elements of his speech. Instead, I choose to focus on the inspirational part.

  • The 2012 choice

    September 27, 2013

    This election will tell us what kind of America we believe in. Is it the one our Founders bequeathed to their posterity of limited government, or is it the one re-made in the image of liberal paternalistic government?

  • What's next?

    September 27, 2013

    Presidential elections decide only who wins the White House and a congressional majority. They don't by themselves solve the nation's problems. George W. Bush had a majority Republican Congress and did little with it. President Obama had a majority Democrat Congress during his first two years in office, but appeared to let ideology trump solutions, causing additional harm to the economy.

  • Zimmerman verdict and double standards

    September 27, 2013

    We are so programmed by our history with race in America that reaction to the acquittal of George Zimmerman on charges of murdering Trayvon Martin depends largely upon one's individual, even group experience.

  • Floating conservatives

    September 27, 2013

    STAVANGER, Norway -- The several hundred conservatives on the National Review's summer cruise, which I was asked to attend as a speaker, are united in what they don't like about the Obama administration and congressional Democrats, but divided on the best strategy for winning the Senate in 2014 and the White House in 2016.

  • 16-year-old has a brave heart

    September 27, 2013

    BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- While American cable TV news engaged in saturation coverage of the closing arguments and verdict in the George Zimmerman murder trial, the BBC and Sky News carried an inspiring speech by Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old Pakistani girl shot in the head last October by the Taliban for advocating the education of girls.

  • Unhappy anniversary

    September 27, 2013

    Last week, politicians who helped craft the Affordable Care Act (ACA) celebrated in self-congratulatory style the third anniversary of that monstrosity which will soon extinguish health care as we've known it.

  • Explaining evil

    September 27, 2013

    Trying to explain an evil act like the one that killed 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., is on a par with explaining how the universe was formed.

  • '60 Minutes'' missed opportunity

    September 27, 2013

    In the days of the late Mike Wallace, "60 Minutes" was known for hard-hitting, aggressive journalism that asked the questions viewers wanted answered and held the powerful accountable.

  • NHS lessons for Obamacare

    September 27, 2013

    FT. WILLIAM, Scotland -- The power of television to shrink the world has always amazed me. Eating lunch on the road to Ft. William, a man at the next table recognizes me and introduces himself.

  • Dark shadows

    September 27, 2013

    The opening scene-setter for the 1996 film "Independence Day" might serve as a metaphor for what Egyptians could face if a draft constitution written by a panel dominated by Islamists and based on Sharia law wins approval in a referendum: "A loud rumble is heard. Suddenly, we are covered in darkness as the shadow engulfs us. Only the image of our Earth hangs in the air, until a huge silhouetted object suddenly blocks our view."

  • The Syria seduction

    September 27, 2013

    Expecting Syria to live up to an agreement between Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov for the cataloging, inspection, removal and eventual destruction or sequester of chemical weapons is a subtle seduction.

  • Then what in Syria?

    September 27, 2013

    Two recent newspaper editorials illustrate the double-mindedness some feel about President Obama's decision to provide small arms and ammunition to Syrian rebels.

  • Syria and history

    September 27, 2013

    Perhaps if America had a successful track record in the Middle East, President Obama's appeal for a "limited" attack on Syria might carry more weight. But because our attention span in the region increasingly resembles that of a fidgety 4-year-old, an examination of recent history is in order.

  • Gun laws and human nature

    September 27, 2013

    In 1983 when President Reagan ordered the deployment of missiles in Europe as part of his "peace through strength" strategy to counter the Soviet Union, the very liberal town of Takoma Park, Md., declared itself a "nuclear free zone." City officials passed an ordinance known as The Takoma Park Nuclear Free Zone Act, which said, "...work on nuclear weapons is prohibited within the city limits..."

  • The president's U.N. speech

    September 27, 2013

    President Obama's speech to the United Nations General Assembly in New York was flawed, displaying a type of moral equivalency that does not exist for America's enemies.

  • Groundhog Day: Middle East version

    September 27, 2013

    In the film "Groundhog Day," Bill Murray wakes up each morning and relives the previous day.

  • When government can't be trusted

    September 27, 2013

    Without the slightest hint of irony, President Obama said last week, "If people can't trust not only the executive branch but also don't trust Congress, and don't trust federal judges, to make sure that we're abiding by the Constitution with due process and rule of law, then we're going to have some problems here."

  • Gosnell's 'clinic of horrors'

    September 27, 2013

    It was the pictures and riveting testimony that convinced a Philadelphia jury that abortion doctor Kermit Gosnell was guilty of murdering three infants born alive following botched late-term abortions and also guilty of the involuntary manslaughter of Karnamaya Mongar, who overdosed on Demerol during an abortion at Gosnell's clinic.

  • Tyranny is no longer 'lurking'

    September 27, 2013

    Given last week's revelation that the IRS targeted conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status, it's worth recalling President Obama's Ohio State University commencement address. The president decried "voices" warning "that tyranny is always lurking just around the corner."

  • Affirming action

    September 27, 2013

    "Character, not circumstance, makes the person." -- Booker T. Washington

  • Drone double standard

    September 27, 2013

    An unsigned and undated Justice Department white paper, obtained by NBC News, reports The New York Times, "...is the most detailed analysis yet to come into public view regarding the Obama legal team's views about the lawfulness of killing, without a trial, an American citizen who executive branch officials decide is an operational leader of Al Qaeda or one of its allies."

  • What's your foreign policy, Mr. President?

    September 27, 2013

    "We maintain the peace through our strength; weakness only invites aggression." -- Ronald Reagan, March 23, 1983

  • Foreign affairs

    September 27, 2013

    Ever since President Clinton "did not have sexual relations with that woman, Miss Lewinsky," whatever remains of standards seem to have fallen even lower among people who hold offices and positions once thought to require good behavior and strong moral character.

  • The lady was a champ

    September 27, 2013

    MANCHESTER, England -- There is a story about Margaret Thatcher, which is probably apocryphal, but speaks volumes about the strength of Britain's first female prime minister, who died Monday at age 87.

  • We've been played

    September 27, 2013

    "One does not sharpen the axes after the right time; after the time they are needed." -- Russian Proverb

  • No skin in the game

    September 27, 2013

    An Internet search is inconclusive as to where the phrase "no skin in the game" originated. Some ascribe it to the late columnist William Safire; others to investor Warren Buffett. Politicians often use the phrase to justify policies to their liking. It can also be applied to the latest in a long list of their outrageous behaviors, as well as to those of President Obama.

  • Unfair and unjust

    September 27, 2013

    Before Attorney General Eric Holder and the Justice Department move forward with a lawsuit to block vouchers for thousands of low-income students trapped in failing Louisiana public schools, he ought to speak to parents whose children benefit from the statewide voucher measured called the Louisiana Scholarship Program.

  • Talking to the Taliban

    September 27, 2013

    After 12 years of fighting, the Taliban in Afghanistan have announced they are ready to talk peace with the United States. The Taliban opened a political office in Qatar. The talks will take place there, but without the Afghan government, which is refusing to take part in the "peace" talks.

  • Marco Rubio: A Hispanic Reagan?

    September 27, 2013

    Conservatives have been dreaming that a political reincarnation of Ronald Reagan would lead them to an electoral promised land. I never put my faith in such a possibility, because the past is a dangerous place in which to live. Reagan never lived in the past, though he learned from it.

  • Benghazi, IRS: Son of Watergate?

    September 27, 2013

    In his defense of President Obama, Press Secretary Jay Carney is beginning to sound a lot like Ronald Zeigler, Richard Nixon's spokesman. Carney only has to use the word "inoperative," as Ziegler did when incriminating evidence surfaced that proved his previous statements untrue.

  • One Night in Bangkok

    September 27, 2013

    BANGKOK -- Most of us can read about sex trafficking with a sense of detachment. It is only when we see its results up close that we are forced to confront the full extent of its horror.

  • Female vs. male senators

    September 27, 2013

    As the son of a woman, the husband of a woman and the father of daughters and granddaughters, I celebrate the record number of females who are now United States senators. However, I do see some differences in the way these and other women are treated, depending on their party, policies and beliefs.

  • Death and life in Maryland

    September 27, 2013

    The Maryland legislature recently voted to abolish capital punishment in the state, making Maryland the sixth state in the last six years to eliminate the death penalty.

  • The sound of inevitability

    September 27, 2013

    Given his track record on marital fidelity, former President Bill Clinton is not the person I would consult about "committed, loving relationships." Clinton used those words in a Washington Post op-ed last week, urging the Supreme Court to overturn the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), which defines marriage as the legal union of one man and one woman, which he signed into law.

  • No boundaries, big problem

    September 27, 2013

    One of the consequences of abandoning a standard by which right and wrong can be judged is our increasing inability to mete out punishment that fits the crime. In fact, too often we weigh extenuating circumstances rather than guilty actions.

  • A constitutional cure for what ails us

    September 27, 2013

    When I studied the U.S. Constitution in school, I learned that for a bill to become law it first had to be introduced in either the House or the Senate. Today, a cynic might say for a bill to become law a member of Congress must first be introduced to a lobbyist.

  • Hagel and defense

    September 27, 2013

    Biography isn't policy. President Obama's choice for secretary of defense, Chuck Hagel, former Nebraska Republican senator, has a resume most politicians can envy: a clean senatorial record, no ethical lapses and two purple hearts from a war many opposed and many more tried to avoid.

  • Jefferson and Ho

    September 27, 2013

    When it comes to Vietnam, I'm all for moving on, putting the past behind us, looking forward, letting bygones be bygones, but doing so requires honesty about the past, lest history be forgotten and the memory and honor tarnished of the 60,000 Americans who died in that war.

  • Broadcast nets: Ailes is what's good for you

    September 27, 2013

    The Bradley Foundation, a private, independent grant-making organization based in Milwaukee, recently handed out its annual Bradley Prize to four men who have, in the words of the organization's mission statement, "(preserved and defended) the tradition of free representative government and private enterprise that has enabled the American nation and, in a larger sense, the entire Western world to flourish intellectually and economically."

  • You gotta have hope

    September 27, 2013

    "You gotta have hope; mustn't sit around and mope." -- "Damn Yankees"

  • The president's take on race

    September 27, 2013

    President Obama rarely misses an opportunity to insert himself into an issue. Last Friday, he appeared in the White House pressroom to comment on the George Zimmerman verdict. The president said he could have been Trayvon Martin. Not likely, given his private schooling and the way he was fast-tracked to success.

  • Final warnings about Obamacare

    September 27, 2013

    PORTSTEWART, Northern Ireland -- Each visit to the U.K. brings new horror stories about the National Health Service (NHS).

  • Detroit's decline

    September 27, 2013

    Since the Motown sound went silent -- except on oldies stations -- and General Motors and Chrysler (but not Ford) required life support from Washington, there has been little to recommend Detroit, Mich., to visitors, much less its residents.

  • Flight of fancy

    September 27, 2013

    President Obama should listen to former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, the "founder" of shuttle diplomacy.

  • Losing faith in government

    September 27, 2013

    Now for some good news, and it has nothing to do with the birth of the royal baby.

  • Who's an extortionist?

    September 27, 2013

    President Obama pledged to end partisanship, but instead has exacerbated it. He recently accused House Republicans of being extortionists for opposing a raise in the debt ceiling and wanting to defund Obamacare.

  • No entitlements

    September 27, 2013

    SINGAPORE -- While the U.S. unemployment rate "dropped" to 7.7 percent last month -- a figure even The Washington Post acknowledged was due "...in large part because the labor force fell by 350,000..." -- here in this modern and prosperous city-state of slightly more than 5 million people, unemployment is practically nonexistent.

  • 'Pharaoh' Morsi

    September 27, 2013

    The diplomatic hosannas for Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi following his brokering of the recent ceasefire between Hamas and Israel were still being heard even as the former head of the Muslim Brotherhood started behaving like a pharaoh. Morsi "temporarily" seized new powers that, among other things, forbid judicial review of his policies.

  • What next after Boston?

    September 27, 2013

    The last time there was a terrorist attack on America, we got the Department of Homeland Security and the Transportation Security Administration. Each entity has spent billions to keep us safe, but neither could stop two brothers, Tamerlan, a permanent resident, and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, a newly minted U.S. citizen, who lived in America and, reportedly, became radicalized jihadists, from killing and maiming innocent people at the Boston Marathon last week.

  • Let us prey

    September 27, 2013

    Our politics have become so polarized and corrupted that a president of the United States cannot even attend an event devoted to drawing people closer to God and bridge partisan and cultural divides without being lectured about his policies.

  • Once more into the snake pit

    September 27, 2013

    "Oh, when will they ever learn? Oh, when will they ever learn?" -- Peter, Paul and Mary

  • The speech, the dream and me

    September 27, 2013

    It was an atypical August summer day in Washington, D.C., 50 years ago next week. Temperatures were in the low 80s, about 10 degrees cooler than normal. Skies were partly cloudy. Most government officials were vacationing.

  • Breakout from politics of the past

    September 27, 2013

    The "Faith and Freedom" Coalition held a gathering last week in Washington, D.C. It resembled many similar conservative assemblies: mostly white male speakers, a mostly white, middle-age audience and mostly full of attacks on President Obama, liberals, Democrats and Washington.

  • The enduring legacy of Anne Frank

    September 27, 2013

    AMSTERDAM -- On the day I visit the Anne Frank House, which is actually the family's hiding place atop Anne's father's business, the wait to get in is as long as three hours. Such is the attraction of this historic site, 53 years after it was opened to the public.

  • The weakened president

    September 27, 2013

    Appearing in the White House Rose Garden last Saturday, President Obama apparently experienced a revelation. He acknowledged there are constitutional limits on his power, something he has heretofore mostly ignored while issuing executive orders, bypassing Congress on appointments and deciding which parts of the Affordable Care Act to follow and which to delay or ignore.

  • Britain's hateful politics

    September 27, 2013

    BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- The death of former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher has prompted reactions from Britain's far left that takes bad taste to new extremes. During its Top 40 music countdown Sunday night, BBC Radio 1 was "forced" to play a seven-second clip of "Ding Dong the Witch is Dead" from the 1939 film "The Wizard of Oz," because Thatcher haters had bought enough copies during a feverish online campaign to bump it to the top of the pop charts. It ultimately reached the number two spot, 5,000 sales short of the top position.

  • Ashton Kutcher's message

    September 27, 2013

    Ashton Kutcher, the 35-year-old actor and ex-husband of actress Demi Moore, has never been considered a poster child for the "family values crowd," but at the Teen Choice Awards two weeks ago, he could have easily passed for one.

  • Taxpayers, revolt!

    September 27, 2013

    Congress returned to "work" this week (now there's a laugh) to complete its lame-duck session before taking another holiday. Spending other people's money is a taxing experience.

  • Recycling old and failed ideas

    September 27, 2013

    President Obama's approach to so-called "climate change" appears to include recycling old ideas.

  • The man

    September 27, 2013

    Baseball great Stan Musial died over the weekend. He was 92.

  • The coming Obamacare disaster

    September 27, 2013

    For years I have been writing about the failures of the UK's National Health Service (NHS) as a warning for what the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) will do to health care here in the U.S.